Trimaran Fire

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by BMcF, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

  2. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

  3. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    The smoke-screen "Stealth" system worked. Maybe start at level 5 instead of 11 next time.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Could be several reasons for this:

    1) When launched, it could have been without any major systems finished. This wont be the first time a boat is launched simply to get headlines and/or stage payments. Being launched does not mean it is a finished boat.

    2) Depending upon the regulations she is designed too, some do not require much SFP for naval vessels. They may have even elected to use "chemical barriers" rather than actual mineral wool type barriers; all to save weight.

    3) The SFP was minimal, to save weight, so much so either it simply wasn't man enough or not installed correctly.

    4) Sabotage. Perhaps the vessel would never have worked, on the money, and is an insurance job to save face rather than go bankrupt?!

    Whatever the truth, bit sad really. Everyone involved must be gutted, excuse the pun :D
     
  5. MechaNik
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    MechaNik Senior Member

    Funny, I was thinking on the lines of option 4 there too. Anyone heard how it was performing on sea trials?
     
  6. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    I think Ad Hoc put #1 down as #1 because I think its most probable. Nearly every ship is launched incomplete, and this can be the most dangerous time for fire on a vessel. Workmen, incomplete installations, lots of electrical and electronics work, more flammable items from the workmen then the vessels are intended to have aboard, Perhaps some fire prevention systems not installed or not completely installed, etc.

    Cool design, I hope they build another.


    Steve
     
  7. HASYB
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    HASYB Senior Member

  8. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    Ad Hoc posited some very credible possibilities, methinks. On perhaps a related note, the cost of the vessel was stated as a paltry12 million USD. If that is true, then I can imagine all sorts of "corners that must have been cut" in materials and design.
     
  9. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    By my rough calc's, the vessel should be around the $22m as a minimum, considering the hardware too. But a realistic figure would be in the $25-30m

    $12m is/was the going rate for a ~45m 400pax fast ferries doing circa 40-45knots, not a high-tech patrol boat made from expensive CF composite!.. just doesn't smell right at that price.
     
  10. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

  11. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Maybe it was, and it was something like this...
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
  12. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Leo. you have a keenly developed sense of humor. So did the smart asses who painted the signs. Love it!
     
  13. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    That fuel truck reminds me of some of the mark-ups I had to deal with when I worked for a ME&P engineer back in the early 1980's. Never afraid to ask a stupid question sure came in handy for me.
     
  14. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    There are many other similar SNAFUs on the net, messabout. They aren't smart-
    asses, but the cheapest bidders and who happen not to know English well.
     

  15. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    didn't the Brits learn about aluminum superstructures on warships

    during Falklands, and these guys go with plastic and carbonfiber?
     
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