transom stringer rebuild

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by dadsretreat, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. dadsretreat
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: sydney

    dadsretreat New Member

    gday guys
    i know this subject has been covered in this site but jus need a few questions answered for my own piece of mind.

    i have a 22ft savage half cab fiberglass with a rotting transom and stringers i want to do this job myself so i can use the best materials and avoid any shortcuts i need it to be stong as im carrying large hp outboard and frequently go offshore so here goes

    1- does my boat have to be off the trailer for the transom and stringer rebuild to avoid hull distortion i will be doing transom first stringers second if so how do i support the boat whilst on the ground?

    2-if the transom is cut out from the back will this weekean the integrity of the hull and new transom i want to do it from inside but the outside looks alot easier and time saving what is the preffered method keeping strentgh in mind?

    3-heard mixed responses on this one when installing the stringers should these be glassed to the hull or should a gap be left between the hull and the stringer?

    finally if i chose to get either the stringers or transom done by a pro which one would u get them to do and which is the easiest for someone to achieve with not much boatbuilding exp i am very handy quick to learn and read lots so i dont doubt i would get it wrong jus trying to keep the $$ down so i can have it back on the water this summer any links regarding this subject would be greatly appreciated

    many thanks in advance :D
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 482, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can leave the boat on the trailer. Strip off the engine, tanks and any other equipment that's in the way. A naked boat is a lot easier to work on.

    Yes, cutting the outer skin off the transom is easier. If you leave a 3" or so flange at the edge of the transom, you'll preserve the integrity of the corners and it'll provide the room to bond the old skin back in place without having to rebuild the transom corners.

    It depends on the age of your boat if it's worth cushioning the stringers. Older boats have thick hull shell laminates and aren't as effected by stress risers (caused by stringers butting against the hull shell), so bonding them directly doesn't hurt anything. On the other hand if the hull has a fairly thin laminate you'll need to provide a cushion (foam, polyurethane, etc.) and use the tabbing to transfer the loading.

    When ready to cut the transom, install a 2x4 brace near the back of the boat to keep it from spreading and flopping around after the cutting. It'll be removed when you're done with the transom, Make sure the trailer fits the boat fairly well and provide additional support where you think distortions might occur. You can't over support it, but you can under support it. With the engine and tanks remove the hull isn't highly stressed so this is in your favor.

    I have no idea who I'd get to do the work if you elect to job it out, though I know where you can find out.

    www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/forumdisplay.php?f=29

    Log on here and ask "BoatMik" where you might find some professional help in Sidney. Tell him PAR sent you and if he gives you a hard time, tell him I'll come down there and smack him around a little.

    I'm not sure which method would be easiest for you. It's a dirty job, but certainly doable by the average backyard boat fixerup'er.
     
  3. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 125
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 150
    Location: Australia

    Typhoon Senior Member

    If it's a 22' Savage ( a Ranger?) then it'll certainly be a very solidly constructed hull. I would heed the good advice above, but just make sure the trailer already supports the hull well (ie, all rollers/skids making good contact). You can also park the trailer somewhere it wont be disturbed, place it on stands and level the whole lot, then fit additional shoring to the hull off teh trailer if need be.
    Replacing a transom from teh outside is certainly easier, but it involves a lot more cosmetic work than an internal rebuild which is something to consider. An internal job usually is cleaned up with a coat of enamel paint or flowcoat, an external job means lots of sanding, fairing and prepping for paint.


    Regards, Andrew.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 482, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed about the internal/external debate, but most boats will need the deck cap cut and/or the splash well removed to get at the transom from the inside, which is a lot more effort for a novice, particularly one trying to make things pretty afterward. Flat surfaces are much easier to fair and the age of the boat suggests it probably needed to be painted anyway.
     
  5. Typhoon
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 125
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 150
    Location: Australia

    Typhoon Senior Member

    Very true.

    Regards, Andrew.
     

  6. blaze_125
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 14
    Location: Canada

    blaze_125 I see the light!

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