transom repair required

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by reelboater, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This stuff (and other pour in transom repair products) are epoxy. This one is foam and not particularly strong foam at that. These types of products are a lot more than just pouring it in. They also need to bond to really clean surfaces, which inside the transom skins is a pretty difficult thing to do. One site recommend a chainsaw (no kidding) to clean the inner transom skins.

    I'm glad Bill had a good time with this stuff, but I think the jury is still out on it's durability (and liability), particularly with less than ideally cleaned inner transom skins. Lastly, not all transom can take this stuff. The transom has to have a full inner skin or when you pour this goo in, it just run out of the transom and pool on the bottom of the boat.
     
  2. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I agree with par. That photo looks like 2 pot foam . I can't see where the strength is coming from. I will be interested to read a report after the op has done a few more trips.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm not that familiar with the physical attributes of this particular product, but it's ability to work in a transom depends on it's density and of course, it's ability to really stick to the inner skins of the transom. I'll assume it's a polyurethane and at least 5 pounds, but I'm guessing. I also dislike foam cores because they need mounting hardware reinforcement.
     
  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    the product looks better in the manufacturers pics. i thought it looked like foam in bills pics . i hope it works well. i have done a similar job using my own resin and glass mix,came out solid as a rock but very heavy compared to ply. i used a long dowel with coarse sand paper to clean the the glass skin and then washed with acetone which allowed the resin to adhere . and i did use a chainsaw which was quick and easy. looking forward to future reports bill.
     
  5. bigdouga
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Carrollton, Georgia

    bigdouga Junior Member

    PAR, I noticed elsewhere that you have extensive experience with transom repairs. I have only done one and that was on an old Appleby aluminum jon boat. It was not nearly as involved as this one appears it will be.

    My original thinking was to glue up a plywood transom as I did with the jonnie and saturate it with spar varnish before inserting it into the existing cavity. After studying this a bit it occurred to me that I needed to somehow have the fiberglass skins adhere to the plywood core.

    So now it is back to square one and I am currently researching the best manner in which to accomplish the task at hand.

    I have posted some pics of my project in another post. If you care to take a look and offer any advice I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to pick your brain a bit.

    Thanks!
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I just did a new transom in a tinny and varnish isn't the way to go, if you want the transom to not rot. I glued two pieces of plywood together with epoxy, then I encapsulated the plywood sandwich, before installing in the boat. Hardware fastener holes were all bonded.

    There are a number of ways to make a transom and each boat offers the approuch. Some can accept a pour in product, others can't. Some will prefer an inert core, while others may just wish it fixed the cheapest way. With these decisions made, the path is usually obvious. Can you post some pictures of your boat, plus make, model and year?
     
  7. bigdouga
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Carrollton, Georgia

    bigdouga Junior Member

    See my post "A New Project"

    PAR I have a post up called "A New Project" I have a few pictures posted in that post. If you need additional pictures I can email some to you. The boat is an Orlando Clipper by the Orlando Boat Company. The best I can determine it would have been built around 1964 or 65. It is a 1572 fiberglass boat with two benches.

    The inner skin of the transom is paper thin and riddled with holes and a couple of tears. I can't see that pouring a transom would be an option. I am assuming the best course of action would to be to remove the inner skin leaving 2"-3" to create a sleeve into which the new transom would go and then re-glass over the transom?

    Have you had any experience with 'Rino liner' type materials stayed on the inside of these types of boats. The idea is to make a comfortable fishing boat out of it.

    Thanks for you input.
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I remember these puppies. They're heavily laid up and poorly built. The inner skin is just a decorative shell to hide the rough chopper gun laminate. They didn't use a polyurethane like Rhino Liner, nor the polyureas that area available. I do have some experience with these coatings and this would be an alternative to finishing it off with a little less effort.

    You're correct in that a pour in solution will not work on that boat. Given the flimsy nature of the inner skin, I wouldn't even bother keeping any of it intact. Even as tabbing it's too weak. That boat isn't rated for a lot of HP, so figure out how much you want and build a transom of the appropriate thickness, bond and tab it into place on the inside of the outer skin. With this (and other repairs) complete, you can consider one of the truck bed liner products.

    Check this handy thread, done a while back.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/al...-personal-link-thread-40721-4.html#post682997
     
  9. bigdouga
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Carrollton, Georgia

    bigdouga Junior Member


    This one happens to be an abandoned boat from my daughter's back yard, literally laying in the woods. At this point the best that I can determine is that the decking is structurally sound. I have several sheets of 3/4" ply lying around that I planned to use on the transom and a casting deck in the front. I don't really have 'big' plans for the boat, just something a little bigger than my 1232 tinny that I currently fish from. At the moment the only real cost to refurbish the hull will be the epoxy, glass and paint.

    The boat was rated for a 40 horse motor, so I will be studying the best way to power her once the restoration is complete. Basically she is something to play with while the garden grows and I am not fishing or working. No timetables for getting her out on the water; more of a learning experience I suppose.
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Two layers of 3/4" plywood, glued together for the transom is the usual way. 3/4" plywood for the casting platform is way to thick on a boat of that size. 1/4" with several fairly closely spaced internal supports (bulkheads, partitions and/or stingers) or 3/8" on a less dense support spacing or 1/2" or an even less closely spaced support system is the way to go. The last thing you want a is a bunch of weight in the bow of a little boat.

    Even though she's rated for 40 HP, I'd consider this too much, so plan on 30 HP as the max rating, especially considering the laminate has seen better days and isn't what it used to be, strength and stiffness wise. A 30 HP outboard will push you fast enough to scare the crap out of you, under a light load.
     
  11. bigdouga
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Carrollton, Georgia

    bigdouga Junior Member

    I assume that any and all wood going into the boat would need to be encapsulated. Your input on HP is helpful, and confirms my leanings. In your opinion would 20 HP be sufficient for fishing Georgia lakes?
     
  12. vitamansea
    Joined: Aug 2015
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    Location: Florida

    vitamansea Junior Member

    Injectadeck repair

    Inject a deck is the way to go to fill that space you can drill it and bolt it the stuff is as hard as Stone need a hammer to dent it. Go to www.injectadeck.com read the instructions very carefully and prepare to be amazed not to mention the instant gratification that your soft spot is gone forever in 30 minutes.

    Sea~
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    More brilliant stuff from sea vitamins? The linked page says, not recommended for transoms in bold text. Hummmmmmm . . .
     

  14. bryanemer7
    Joined: Aug 2016
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    Location: Minneapolis

    bryanemer7 Junior Member

    I would look at using SpaceAge Thermo-Lite Board. It is similar to Coosa in terms of the foam and fiberglass but much better quality, consistency and service.

    http://spaceagesynthetics.com/
     
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