transom repair/replacement?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by ldolbee, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. ldolbee
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Michigan

    ldolbee New Member

    I have an old 1977 Century fiberglass boat with a cracked transom. I've been reading about many people who suffer the same problem. What is the best way to repair the transom?
     
  2. Boataholic
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 4
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    Location: Texas

    Boataholic New Member

    Boataholic

    I replaced the transom in two i/o bowrider style boats. The first one I had a shop do the work for a cost of about $1500. The second I did myself for about $400. First you must remove the engine, drive & all wiring, pumps etc from the inside of the boat. Then physically tear out the old transom from the inside, all rotten wood etc. Leave the fiberglass hull (the part with the gelcoat) intact. On one of my applications I found that the floor was also rotten and had to replace it as well. Depending on the boat you may need to go below the floor and then replace some or all of it. For my installations I replace the transom with a composit material which I bought from a local boat builder for a couple hundred $. You simply cut it to fit into the required space, cut the hole for the dive unit to go through with a rotozip or jig saw. Using fiberglass & resign, fiberglass the transom in place. If you have never used fiberglass before there are several video series available on the web which can be purchased for not to much money. You can order the boat yard resigns and fiberglass mat from west marine or boaters world. Reinstall the engine and you are in business. Not an easy job, but if you are handy, and feel comfortable working with fiberglass you can do it.
     
  3. Boataholic
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Texas

    Boataholic New Member

    I replaced the transom in two i/o bowrider style boats. The first one I had a shop do the work for a cost of about $1500. The second I did myself for about $400. First you must remove the engine, drive & all wiring, pumps etc from the inside of the boat. Then physically tear out the old transom from the inside, all rotten wood etc. Leave the fiberglass hull (the part with the gelcoat) intact. On one of my applications I found that the floor was also rotten and had to replace it as well. Depending on the boat you may need to go below the floor and then replace some or all of it. For my installations I replace the transom with a composit material which I bought from a local boat builder for a couple hundred $. You simply cut it to fit into the required space, cut the hole for the dive unit to go through with a rotozip or jig saw. Using fiberglass & resign, fiberglass the transom in place. If you have never used fiberglass before there are several video series available on the web which can be purchased for not to much money. You can order the boat yard resigns and fiberglass mat from west marine or boaters world. Reinstall the engine and you are in business. Not an easy job, but if you are handy, and feel comfortable working with fiberglass you can do it.
     
  4. ldolbee
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Michigan

    ldolbee New Member

    Transom replacement/repair

    Thanks for the quick reply. You mentioned two different places to purchase resin and fibreglass. Are they on line or local shops? I live in Michigan and have not heard of either one of the places you mentioned.
    Thanks
    Larry
     
  5. Boataholic
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 4
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    Location: Texas

    Boataholic New Member

    Where to buy

    www.boatersworld.com or www.westmarine.com

    both do also have stores around the country but you can order online. The resign that you get from them is a boat yard resign and has a longer working time than the resigns that you get from say Autozone. Make sure to do the work in climate controlled conditions, if you use the resign in to cold of a temperature it will not cure properly. To hot, it cures to fast. When you are working with the stuff make sure to wear clothes you plan on throwing away afterward. Make sure to use disposable gloves.
     
  6. ldolbee
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Michigan

    ldolbee New Member

    Thanks for the information!
     

  7. FibrSupplyDepot
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 23
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    Location: Fort Pierce

    FibrSupplyDepot Fiberglass Supply Depot

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