Transom condition

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by tommyboy050, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. Zappi
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Puget Sound

    Zappi Senior Member

    I've been watching this thread progress from the day it started. I cringed the first posting of pics. Tommyboy... I dont know why youre wasting anyones time here. You had youre mind made up before you even posted. I'm thinking youre 25 or younger and not made many fatal purchases yet. We all have done it. We all learn from it. Follow through with it. Use it for a season and then you'll realize what you've purchased. You're paying too much even without the stress cracks and shoddy repairs. The dealer probably got the boat for nearly free, acquired the motor from a thousand dollar boat and installed it. The boat market is extemely soft not so dissimiliar to your transom. Consider it a small lake boat, get full coverage ins. and wear a life jacket. You're hopeless.
     
  2. Zappi
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Puget Sound

    Zappi Senior Member

    Good luck with the Eska. Youre gonna need it!
     
  3. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    Okay Zappi, got ya, maybe you can at least figure out my age via my user name but then again... LOL, geez! Done...
     
  4. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    I had a Boat inspector look at my transom crazing/cracks (see previous pics). He had a piece of equipment that measures moisture. He did a full inspection and found that YES my transom has been compromised. The fiberglass to the plywood has been compromised due to the transom showing a level of moisture. This is why I am getting the crazing/cracks. The transom was moist from about the water level down and completely dry above that. The report is that my transom is not rotted and is just fine for the age of the boat. The only other moisture that was found was on top of the cuddy where my moon roof is, from the moon roof to the front (top section only), although not really bad, it is expected with the age of the boat. I did reseal all the railing, window and cleats just to stop any further water penetration.

    I did end up etching every small and large, long and short crazing and cracks on my transom with a dremel. I then cleaned with acetone then Marine-tex every etching done, a bit of sanding with 200 grit, cleaning with acetone and 2 coats of Gel coat and a final 600 grit light sanding. I did find a spot down by my drain plug that was showing fiberglass, I marine-tex’d that and a spot in front of the boat. Looked pretty good after all that work.

    Although I have done all this work the inspector did not think it necessary and that the crazing/cracks will most likely come back due to the transom being compromised. He thought to just take pictures of the crazing/cracks and look at them again in a month to see if they are getting any worse. But, I did all the work and I guess I will see if I get crazing and cracks, will report back in a month or so.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Any time a transom lets in water, it runs to the bottom of the transom core. Gravity is fairly reliable in this regard. In spite of the inspector's moisture meter, it's very unlikely he can get accurate readings, without a lot of guess work. This is true of all commonly available moisture meters and a bit of a falsehood in the industry. Once a very common tool, now not given much respect, mostly because areas that read dry, turn out to be wet upon further inspection. There was a recent piece in Professional Boat Builder not long ago on this very subject, worth a look see.

    Once moisture gets into a transom core, it can't get out, so the core rots, usually from the bottom up, which is what you're experiencing now. In short, if there's moisture in the core, you have rot. This isn't a debate, it's a certainty. You can try to skate along, hoping to get lucky with some cosmetic crack repairs, but the core is rotting as we discuss this. In other words, you're on borrowed time and lets pray that the rot can be addressed before the engine literally twists the transom off the boat. I've seen this happen, more then once and usually the engine, controls and transom are totaled.
     
  6. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    There is no pleasing you, I entered my transom issue with pictures and I got all kinds of crap that my transom is shot, rotted, gone and the stringers. I get told to get it inspected. I get my boat inspected and your not happy that my inspection showed that my transom was okay. The person who inspected it does it for a living and is well known in my area. While he was inspecting it he was giving me all the feedback I wanted and needed and more info that I expected for the cost, I was very pleased with his knowledge and work. If your not happy that my transom is okay and still think what you think, so be it, I am done with ya. Oh yes, I have had my boat on the water for about a month now and the cracks have not come back, (knock on wood). Get it WOOD! (not saw dust)
     
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  7. GTO
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Alabama

    GTO Senior Member

    bayliner cabin cruisers

    Slight hijack here.

    I have been shopping Bayliner cabin cruisers, 26 - 28 feet, between 1985ish and 1992 or so. All I could hope to afford.
    Just how common is the transom issue for the I/Os?
    And absent transom cracks, is there any way to identify problem transoms?

    Thanks.
     
  8. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    I am not one to ask this question since this is my first boat. I grew up around boats all my life, my parents always had a few and since I was practically born on the ocean, boats where part of our life. This is the first boat I have owned myself and I am learning. I am a certified mechanic and been in high tech for over 20 years as a Hardware Engineer and Software Engineer so I can fix just about anything mechanical and electrical. When it comes to a boat Hull/shell, I am still learning but willing to learn all I can.

    As for if I were to look for another boat, I surely would check out the transom, stringers and hull for cracks, strength and rot. Not so concern about mechanical/electrical issues on anything I buy because I can fix/modify/reverse engineer just about anything. Of course the price would go down if it did have mechanical/electrical issues. If you find a boat, read all you can about the boat and if you really like it, get it inspected if you really feel the need.

    My transom seemed solid even though it had crazing and cracks showing. Bouncing on the motor did not move the transom at all and tapping on the transom did not reveal much. The inspection set my mind at ease and I am happy.
     
  9. Saildude
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Seattle, Washington, USA

    Saildude Junior Member

    The surveyor said you had wet core in the bottom of the transom, that would have me very concerned and on the top of my list to fix. Wet core will not get better and the water will continue to damage the core.

    As to if the transom will fall off that is above my pay-grade and would be difficult to determine without an onsite inspection and maybe even opening up the transom to inspect the core.

    Moisture meters are not the end all and tapping even by an experienced surveyor a find all - I just finished replacing and drying out most of the cockpit sole on my boat - the surveyor when tapping found a small amount of delam in one area, a moisture meter showed that there was water in many areas that were not yet delam but were weakened by moisture. The moisture meter missed a couple of areas that were completely rotted but had dried out.

    When you repair the core in the transom you also want to make sure that all holes are properly done so that there is no exposed core. The core should be cut back around the holes and the cutback area filled with the proper material.

    Making proper holes in any hull and especially those that have a core must be done correctly to prevent damage in the future.
     
  10. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    I did what was recommended and had my boat inspected. The inspector even said he would not do anything to the boat, what was found was normal for it's age and for me to enjoy it. He told me the motor is NOT going to fall off or anything like it but I did insist on making the repairs I mentioined even though he thought it not needed. I sealed all areas that had any screws, holes and every area I thought could be breached. I will take what my inspector says and enjoy my boat. When it comes time to tear into my transom, I will address that when needed, it is not needed now from what I was told and I believe him because he personally inspected my boat. The transom looks nothing like the pictures anymore, looks like a normal transom and if water is inside doing it thing, well, this boat is old and like the inspector said "normal for it's age".
     
  11. tommyboy050
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    tommyboy050 Junior Member

    Well my boat has been in the water all summer and just took it out. No stress cracks came back. Looks like all the work I did on the transom worked. So much for my transom being "toast"! Transom looks good and seems solid.
     

  12. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The continued integrity of your transom could be a testament to the power of prayer. :D
     
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