Transmission questions

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by JordieS, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. JordieS
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: Australia

    JordieS Junior Member

    Hi everyone,

    Just wondering how people connect the transmission to the engine (are any custom parts needed?) and how they get to control the transmission and engine from the one lever, how is the throttle and gears connected to the stick?

    Thanks
     
  2. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: united states

    FMS Senior Member

    You will always have two push-pull cables, one for throttle and one for shift.
    Some people prefer separate sticks, one for throttle and one for shift.
    Other people prefer a combined throttle/shift lever. These are the most common on smaller boats. When you move the throttle/shift lever from neutral it either pulls or pushes the shift cable. When it goes further than 10 degrees it pushes the throttle cable. You can probably find a diagram showing the mechanical arrangement of a teleflex or mercury or morse shift/throttle mechanism by searching.
     
  3. JordieS
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    JordieS Junior Member

    Oh ok thanks, so say you get a inboard diesel from Volvo Penta and then connect it to a ZF gearbox, you would get a stick from ZF or Volvo and it essentially plugs into the engine and transmission? As the diesels from Volvo are now electronically controlled how would it work?

    Thanks
     
  4. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    FMS Senior Member

    One of the other guys here will have to answer regarding compatibility of different makes of newer electronic control setups. I still prefer simple push pull cables for throttle/shift where it comes down to the end style on the cable.
     
  5. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    There are analog and digital electronic solutions for throttle control and gear shift, possibly even hydraulic ones too. But most common is the single lever mechanical control, identical to the remote units for outboards.
    Although it is simpler and cheaper to control a modern engine by wire, a mechanical system is better understood. Even in most passenger cars with electronically controlled engines, the accelerator pedal still pulls a bowden cable. In the higher market segment there is an increasing number models with electronic sensors.
    Of course the -conservative- boating industry will eventually follow, but it may take at least another 10 years.
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    That may well be CDK but ther is not a car yet made that you cant hammer on the brakes and stop it full throttle or not or kill the motor

    In a boat the very thing that pushes you forward is required to stop you, kill the motor is the last thing you need to do.

    Its got nothing to do with conservative, its trust, and the collosal damage one could do with a failure, 100times what you could do with the worst case senario on a car.

    Why do it when cable works just as well.
     
  7. JordieS
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: Australia

    JordieS Junior Member

    Are inboards any harder to install than say sterndrives? What are all the names of the parts needed for an inboard installation from transmission to prop, what seals and couplings are needed in between?

    Are there any modern books about inboard installations etc (not the 1978 one from Glen L)

    Thanks
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Sterndrives are easier in general.
     
  9. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...have a look at the Teleflex Morse site, all is explained in full.
     
  10. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    A modern BMW or Mercedes engine has no mechanical throttle control at all, just a 3-pin input for a potentiometer or rotary sensor that is located at the swivel point of the accelerator pedal. Within a few years all car makers will have such a system because it is cheaper than a cable, needs no extra hole, grommet etc .

    Of course for marine use one could install the sensor in the engine bay, put a pullback spring on it and use a bowden cable to the helm, but what would be the advantage?
     

  11. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Technology always attracts a buyer, and when its out of warranty you have to live with it.

    Its up to you but as I have said before I will not be buying such engines.
     
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