Transat Jacques Vabre 2013, MOD70 & Multi50

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Corley, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. Blackburn
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 842
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: Florida

    Blackburn Senior Member

    Seal off those places where water is entering the capsized hull, and then pump the seawater out before righting the boat - that's something I'd expect they'll also like to do, unless Lalou's already done it during his long wait.
     
  2. pipeline
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii

    pipeline Junior Member

    How does one keep four tons of water in the stern only? Possibility when the boat is beginning to be righted, the water flows to the stern? There are no water tight bulkheads that I know of in the boat, unless they build their own after the tug arrives.
     
  3. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,757
    Likes: 182, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    the may use bladders to add the water rather than putting it directly into he hull shell, just a thought.
     
  4. Blackburn
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 842
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: Florida

    Blackburn Senior Member

    ...

    The first photo shown of the capsize.

    Doesn't look like seawater in the hull is any problem at all.

    Almost looks as if Lalou has used some tricks to make his boat levitate?

    Fix the daggerboard max down, something buoyant added under the boat?

    Probably not I suppose, but still it looks odd that only the coach roof and helm cowlings, and part of the beams, are submerged!

    [​IMG]



    Those beams must account for most of it:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,653
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    I guess if it had a sealed wing mast still intact and in place that might have a lot of lift?
     
  6. Blackburn
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 842
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: Florida

    Blackburn Senior Member

    I think they spoke about clearing away bits of the mast the other day, which were impacting under the boat. Could be a section of the mast under the starboard hull, or maybe part of a sail.
     
  7. Baltic Bandit

    Baltic Bandit Previous Member

    A sealed wing mast on an ocean racing tri that is strong enough to withstand a captsize? Seriously?
     
  8. Blackburn
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 842
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: Florida

    Blackburn Senior Member

    ^^^

    lol


    [​IMG]


    Doug, I've got some advice...

    Start making a few posts on this forum.

    They have exorcists there!

    :)
     
  9. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,653
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    =================
    Do you think that would work in this case??!
     
  10. Blackburn
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 842
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: Florida

    Blackburn Senior Member

    People come to them with all sorts of vague complaints, it usually takes some time to evaluate each case, and most get turned down. It's true.

    But when they see how unfailingly this particular demon materializes, I think they'll be thrilled to help, right away.


    ... Remember not to eat anything, beforehand!


    ;)
     
  11. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,121
    Likes: 54, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    You shouldn't feed the wee beasties.....ignore them to starve them out. Everybody can see them for what they are so don't take the bait and respond in defense. The moniker implies a theft of something, in this case it seems to be time....
     
  12. Baltic Bandit

    Baltic Bandit Previous Member

    hmm would you guys mind posting on topic rather than distracting yet another thread you participate in?
     
  13. pipeline
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii

    pipeline Junior Member


    Those beams must account for most of it:

    ... Yes, I am in agreement, Blackburn. Those 'iako's or beams have a lot of interior volume. Hate to see this boat towed as is. You know, on a side note, this is #2 capsize for Lalou. I wonder if his "marketability" will take a slight hit here? These "affordable" racing tris aren't that cheap to build. At a million+ euros a copy, sponsors will want to see their boat finish, not in a world-wide image of a capsized trimaran, above.
     
  14. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,757
    Likes: 182, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    They are going to tow the boat back in seastate was too rough apparently to risk the righting attempt:

    From the Transat Jacques Vabre website:

    http://www.transat-jacques-vabre.com/en/when-pit-stops-count

    Multi 50’s, Long Tow to Madeira for Arkéma - Region Aquitaine
    There is little change at the front of the Multi50 fleet where Erwan Le Roux and Yann Eliès on FenetreA Cardinal have Actual (Le Blévec and de Pavant) directly behind them as they start to contemplate their Doldrums passage, one which looks set to be less straightforward than that which prevailed for the MOD70’s. Le Roux and Eliès opened more than 20 miles on the second placed Multi 50 today and lead by 120 miles.
    Although they are safe on board the Portuguese tug and Lalou Roucayrol and Mayeul Riffet are recovering from their 85 hours ordeal in the upturned Arkema Region Aquitaine, they are not yet able to relax. Conditions mean that, along with the tug company, they have decided to tow the upturned hull to Madeira, 285 miles downwind. They expect to reach there sometime in the middle of next week.
    Speaking to French radio yesterday they relived the conditions in the capsized trimaran:

    “We are feeling a bit better having had a shower and some food”, explained Mayeul Riffet, the co-skipper on Arkema – Région Aquitaine. “We did try and turn the boat over but the maneouver is virtually impossible with the sea state being so bad. We tried to while away the time but had a lot of maintenance work to secure the boat which involved diving to clear rigging and daily check outside. We had time to talk and philosophize on life, the future and think. We had to set ourselves objectives try and achieve them. Each time the ETA for the tugs arrival was delayed, we found it really tough. Conditions really worsened and the waves were breaking over the upturned hulls. We were lucky to have battery power inside despite being upturned, which gave us light at night and the ability to communicate. With no beacons it was only thanks to the GPS position given, that the tugboat managed to find them.”

    Roucayrol described the transfer onto the tug as: “ Dangerous and frightening with very strong winds and angry and breaking waves.”
     

  15. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,757
    Likes: 182, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    A video from FenetreA Cardinal shows them cruising in trade wind conditions well ahead of the next Multi50 Actual.

    http://youtu.be/0jcTMJEfKWQ

     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.