Trailerable modern design weekender? Lion 550?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by J1234, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. J1234
    Joined: Mar 2017
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Boise

    J1234 New Member

    I'm looking for a relatively straightforward small modern trailerable sailboat design suitable for a first-time builder (something on the order of 18-22'). Use would be lakes and rivers primarily for weekend trips - so it must sleep 2 comfortably, be big enough to stick a portable toilet somewhere, and have reasonably decent performance. Asthetics-wise, I like the wide beam of the mini transat boats, a plump bow, and square top mainsail. My wood working and fabrication skills are pretty good, so even if it is small I don't want to invest my time on something that doesn't have the 'look' I'd like.

    I recently found the Lion 550, but have no idea if it is a good design. Also, my concern with building a sailboat is finding/spec'ing out appropriate hardware - especially something like this where it looks like there are only a handful of renders available and no actual builds.

    Another design I've looked at is the Didi 23, but not thrilled with design of the cabintop, and prefer somewhat more modern lines overall.

    Not sure if there are other designs I'm missing, or if anyone has thoughts/suggestions - particularly on the Lion 550.
     
  2. Turnpoint
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 45
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Port Townsend

    Turnpoint Junior Member

    Hi J1234,
    Those both look like very nice boat designs. I really like the lines and details of that Lion 550.... hadnt seen that before... Thanks for sharing those! Im working on a little version of that myself... 15' overall though and more of a raid type micromini so not nearly as big of an interior as those.
    One detail I would be interested in is how they manage their large beam upwind? If you look at these modern types of wide/pie shaped boats they have a narrow /more streamlined displacement waterlplane shape when they are heeled 15 to 20 degress upwind that drastically reduces wetted surface area when they are in displacement mode. BUT, that waterplane shape is scewed 5 to 9 degrees from the boats centerline...there are some good discussions on this other places online. Because of this (and canting keels) the mini 6.5's will have twin dagerboards that are toed in and assymetrical to line up with that scewed waterplane shape. I would be very interested to see how both of the designs you linked to address that design issue upwind? Dudley Dix is defininately a great designer of those types of boats for the home builder so I am sure he has this issue covered....but I am very interested in the details.
     
  3. Unik
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Ukraine

    Unik Junior Member

    Lion 550 I conceived how to maximize the technological and simple in the construction of a boat. Soon, we plan to begin construction of the Lion 550, all information about the construction process, and operation will be published.
     

  4. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 4,928
    Likes: 123, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I'd go a bit longer for comfort - 22ft is small for camping out. You might find multi-chine a bit easier for a first build, with little appreciable effect on performance. 'Unik' knows his way around sailing yachts, and is a keen competitor himself, and the standard of plans drawn are exceptional. Mr Dix has a great reputation as well. Both of these seem better boats than say the very 'British' boxes from Selway Fisher Pocket Cruisers 16' to 20' http://www.selway-fisher.com/PC1620.htm. Keep us posted on your decision and good luck.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.