Trailerable houseboat designs

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by silentneko, May 2, 2021.

  1. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

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  2. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Forward buoyancy in a boat results in even more pounding and slamming. Boat goes up and comes down on a wider forefoot and the sea does not behave as a pillow.

    The only way to reduce pounding is a knife like entry a/o massive weight forward, think Bertrams. Or any knifelike forward hull, think Skoota. Bulbous perhaps, but...

    Anyhow, you won't get less pounding with more hull forward unless perhaps heavy displacement vessel which is another story, hull speed limits, etc.
     
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  3. Dejay
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Dejay Senior Newbie

    I half jokingly suggested a "trailerboat" in this thread. I live in EU so regulations for trailers are a bit more complicated. But I think you could just use a road legal flatbed trailer and build something like this flatbottom pacific power dory around it. Basically fiberglass on top and on the bottom with either XPS or plywood in between, then adding sides. The weight of the trailer is at the flat bottom so aids with stability.
    You'd have a detacheable bow that can hide and protect the trailer hitch of the trailer. The trailer itself would aid with the strength of the boat. You could even have it large enough to drive your car onto the boat and use it as a ferry.
    I mean trailer regulation say nothing about cladding your trailer to look like a boat :D It would be tricky with electrical lines and break lines though.

    The ferry idea is madness of course but just getting a used suitable trailer and building a flat bottom dory around it and "encapsulating" it should be possible.

    I'd love to see someone design and build something like that :D

    PS: Also apologize for thread drift!
     
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  4. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    We sure did go down a rabbit hole or two, didn't we fellas. Ok let me figure this out.

    I'm a big fan of Jennifer Connelly, but I liked her better when she had a little more meat on her bones like in the Rocketeer.

    I'm not looking for a boat with bolt on wheels. If I lived down the street from a ramp maybe, but on the highway at 70+mph that seems like a recipe for disaster.

    Building a floating trailer or canal barge style isn't exactly what I'm looking for. And I can picture my truck sliding off the side of a ferry, so I think I'll steer clear of that one, lol.

    As far as buoyancy vs pounding, I know it's a balancing act in design. If it gets sporty I'd rather pound a bit on the hook then take water over the deck. The little hobo we rented did well most of the time, but did take a little water over the bow from a larger boat cruising past us. Not enough to concern me, but enough to get me thinking about the design and adding freeboard. The boat, being a monohull was super stable because our weight was lower. A cat, Pontoon, or to the lesser extent the sled, would have a higher center of gravity and lower overall freeboard in such a short form.

    I'd really like something like a Sea Camper, but outboard powered with a euro transom for a portable generator. I thought about finding one, but the restoration, conversion, and restyling would likely cost more then a newer build. Who knows, maybe I will build something like Roys boat or even convert an old trihull, but this is likely my inspiration.

    182868108_10222368847867818_771662427550619163_n.jpg
     
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  5. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    20210220_114300.jpg
    Lots of freeboard here. 26' loa.
     
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  6. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    That does look like it has plenty of freeboard, but doesn't look like a scalled tx18. I'm still not sure it is for me though.

    There has to be a site other then Glen-L and Bateau that has some plans to look through.
     
  7. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

  8. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I have many of the old magazines from Mertens extensive magazine collection. If you see any vintage houseboat designs, I could looks for the plans. i.e. google boat builder houseboat, etc
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

  10. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    Thanks. I've seen a bunch of vintage articles and plans, but are there no modern builds out there? I see these older houseboats like yukon deltas and adventure crafts still commanding good money so there must be a market or fan base.
     
  11. jbo_c
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    jbo_c Junior Member

    Are you opposed to a traditional shanty boat design like Millie Hill?

    I’m actually about ready to start a shanty boat build myself and will be relying heavily on Millie Hill for inspiration.

    Just need to see if Marine ply has done the same thing crap ply from big box stores has done lately. I’m a little scared to ask.

    Jbo
     
  12. mitchgrunes
    Joined: Jul 2020
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    mitchgrunes Junior Member

    I know this if off-topic, but do I take it that there are Florida inland waterways that alligators don't get into?

    Also, are fires common on small craft with outboard motors, that can't be put out by a fire extinguisher? (Assuming you don't smoke in bed.)
     
  13. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    If I lived on a calm lake, or a river then it would be just fine. I'll be using mine along the Florida coastal waters, maybe even take the ICW all the way north. The shanty boats with its basic hull shape would not be ideal for this.
     
  14. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    In Florida I feel like we define things a bit different then some other places. You have off shore, near shore (beaches and coast up to a few miles out), in shore (Shallows along the coast usually with mangrove islands, and inland lakes and rivers. Anything inland will have gators, but rarely will they be in the saltwater. Except down in the keys and glades, then we have saltwater crocs. All in all they are not dangerous creatures if you just leave them be.

    As far as fires go, no not common at all. Outboards are safer then most inboard setups IMO. I've had many friends who have had fires on inboard and I/O's, but none that have had issues with an outboard. Since it's not below deck, if something was to happen it can usually be dealt with quickly.
     

  15. Heimfried
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    Heimfried Senior Member

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