Trailerable houseboat designs

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by silentneko, May 2, 2021.

  1. jbo_c
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: Gainesville, GA

    jbo_c Junior Member

    If you have a minute, could you PM me about where you cruised out of on the St. John’s. My wife and I are considering a trip there as well and I’d appreciate knowing what your thoughts were of the place you rented from as well as the cruise from that location.

    Thanks.
    Jbo
     
  2. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    Pm sent.

    I'll respond more in a bit, I'm tied up at work.
     
  3. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    Sorry, getting back to it guys.

    Right I understand like hulls and such for displacement speeds, but the formula doesn't take into account anything but length. If 2 hulls are 20ft long one being a wide barge, the other being a slick sailer, I can't see them having the same speed. My brain just can't accept that. One would think as length and friction increase speed would be reduced.

    I'm not against the GT23, but I would rather a design with a sharper entry. Also, though he has been talking about it for over a decade, Jacques has yet to redo all of the plans for foam. I don't want a wood, especially okoume, hull again. For the obvious reasons, and you can't hardly get them insured anymore.

    As far as composite foam work being slow, I'm not talking about vaccum bagging, but more the Chris Morejohn style. I'm not sure if you know who that is, but he was the originator of the Hells Bay designs that is still the standards for high performance skiffs and flats boats. For his new designs like the Conchfish and Beryllium, he specs foam core like CarbonCore sheathed in several layers (3+) of 10oz woven cloth, carbon, or basalt, and epoxy. The result is a very durable boat that is still lighter then plywood cored equivalents. I would need to upside the core and add an addition few layers of glass for something as big as I'm thinking. It does take more time because of the additional layers of glass, but it results in way less failing then biaxial so it's a trade off.
     
  4. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    That is a possibility. Those old glass tubs are everywhere, but finding one that isn't completely rotted is a challenge. That is part of the reason I started building my own boats. It was easier to start from scratch then fix other guys mistakes and restore a hull sometimes.
     
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  5. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    I've admired this for a while and chatted with Roy. I love the design, and if I was on a smaller lake chain, or river I'd do it. However, on the bays and coast the flat bottom I feel will be uncomfortable when on the hook with the amount of wind we get at times.
     
  6. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    I think everyone knows what I'd recommend. It's possible I talk too much.
     
  7. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    And that is why I prefer new residential construction over renovations.
     
  8. silentneko
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    silentneko Junior Member

    I don't frequent this site as much as I used to. So what do you recommend?
     
  9. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    So I completely forget about the Glen-L site. So it has some plans that are closer to what I thought.

    Like the gypsy
    20' Gypsy - trailerable houseboat-boatdesign https://www.boatdesigns.com/20-Gypsy-trailerable-houseboat/products/168/

    Or the quest
    23' Quest - trailerable houseboat-boatdesign https://www.boatdesigns.com/23-Quest-trailerable-houseboat/products/173/

    I like the hulls on these better. They are planing hulls, but that doesn't mean they won't work well on a slow cruise. Especially since I'd be making them from foam core the HP requirements would allow for decent fuel economy. These are old school plans and would need to be modified, and I'd change the style of the cabin, but might be a start?
     
  10. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    Bateau's tx18. Or check out my build thread on Fiberglass and Composite. 26 by 10, 130 sq' livable inside. Not trailerable, but scaleable.

    I'm a big fan of the Hickman Sea Sled form.
     
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  11. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Neko, it might be feasible to scale up the TX 18 a bit to suit your requirements?
    https://www.boatbuildercentral.com/StudyPlans/TX18_STUDY.pdf

    Here is a link to DC's thread about his home designed and built Sea Sled -
    Sea Sled madness. It’s in my brain. https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/sea-sled-madness-it%E2%80%99s-in-my-brain.63079/
     
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  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Both will have the same hull speed. However, one will need more power to reach it.
     
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  13. silentneko
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    silentneko Junior Member

    I appreciate the thoughts on the Texas sled, but it's not what I'm looking for. It suffers from the same issues as a cat/pontoon, a lack of forward buoyancy. Great for calmer waters especially once on plane, but on the rare occasions when it gets sporty I don't think it's ideal.

    I'm trying not to bash bateau to much, but I don't see myself buying another set of plans there.

    Thanks guys.
     
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  14. Squidly-Diddly
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I want a trailerable houseboat with its own wheels, so no extra trailer required. Ideally could drive itself on land at least 25mph to nearest parking and don't even care too much about getting a ticket for "not legal vehicle". Something that is 80% boat and 20% RV, instead of that big RV that can go in water. But should be at least able to be pulled out of water on its own wheels and pulled or pushed from there. Carry the wheels (axles) out of the water once floating to save bearings? Maybe, but I hear today's sealed bearings are pretty good. Will that add weight to the boat VS conventional? Sure but in less than huge boat that is built for comfort not speed extra weight isn't all bad. Maybe use the road wheels to protect against grounding damage to hull and/or as bumpers. Sure the black tire rubber will leave a mark on some dude's fancy white yacht but should buff out, or just put those RV style tire covers on them.
     
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  15. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    Well, if we are talking wishes, Jennifer Connelly could stop disappearing from my bed every time I wake up. It's starting to hurt my feelings!
     
    Stofferaus likes this.
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