Trailer usage for launching

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by narnold, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. narnold
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Plymouth

    narnold New Member

    Hi. I am a Design Engineer at the University of Nottingham, currently undertaking my final masters project with the topic of watersports transportation and security. My main focus is on how to improve trailers for boat users. Please complete my short online questionannire (use link below) or leave any comments if you wish to help. Any answers are anonymous and much appreciated. Thank you
    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/VYTHVZD
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Jeez... dont have the patience for the questionnaire.

    One problem with boat trailers is storage once the boat is in the water. Why not reduce a trailers footprint when not in use ?

    Many boat owners damage there boats during storage because they didnt raise the tongue high enough to allow any water which leaked into the boat to drain out of the transom plug. Why not build a bubble level into the tongue ?

    Tires are damaged when the boat sits on them during storage Why not make it easy for a boater to jack up and block the trailer ?

    Each year boaters spend millions repairing trailer lights . Hmmmmmm...............................
     
  3. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    The emergence of good LED trailer lights that are completely sealed all the way up to the front end of the trailer has done away with most of the lighting issues.
    But the bloke who comes up with afoolproof bearing and brake systems that don't fall apart the after the 1st time it's dipped in salt water.... well.... he'll be my hero.
     
  4. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    So right will. I recently tore off and disposed of the second set of brakes. Neither worked satisfactorily for more than one year. No brakes now but, at least the wheels don't lock up. Installing LED light system and have to seal the connections at the side lights. One thing I would be willing to pay for is gold plated trailer electric plugs. A foolproof and waterproof connector would be nice. How about rust proof springs? How about a built in walkway on trailers for large boats?
     
  5. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    The biggest improvement I could see would be some way to minimize the amount of space the trailer takes up when the boat is on it. I know a lot of people paying $100/month just to store the trailer plus slip rental.

    Some way to lean it back over the aft end... Maybe have it collapse down from there.
     
  6. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    If you're prepared to pay for them, there's a crowd in Oz that make bronze hubs, brakes etc. They are the best we've found...
    www.titanbrakes.com.au


    Our LED's came with quite long wiring. We ran all of them up to a (sealed) junction box on top of the winch post, then a nother set down to the pin connector. Never had a problem since
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  7. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    Here in Europe most trailers are built by idiots. Open ended chassis tubes and axles, unprotected brake parts and hub seals that cannot even keep the dust out. Instead of hydraulics simple Bowden cables are used; the invention of stainless steel hasn't reached this part of the industry yet. Because the light bar must be removable, there are unsealed wiring sockets bolted to the chassis behind the wheels. To fool the customer there is a cap covering the socket when the plug is pulled, but the backside is exposed to seawater.
    With the trailer connected to the vehicle you can see a trail of foam emerging from the submerged sockets at the rear when the driver steps on the brake.
     
  8. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    CDK,

    I think I own that trailer. It's amazing how poorly built they are around the world.
     

  9. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

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