Today, you are a castaway! ...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by valter.f, Aug 8, 2016.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I wouldn't want to be in a Hampden is big swells and heavy seas, that's for sure. It's a lobster boat hull form and it would be it's stern tossed around like a rag doll in a steep sea. There are lots of life boat models to choose from and these would obviously be, the areina you'd want to play in, given the situation envisioned.
     
  2. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    dang, they made a couple stops on Australia and still got back in the boat to chance the open sea.

    I think I'd have stayed put and resorted to large signal fires.
     
  3. valter.f
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    valter.f Junior Member


    I understand, and makes a lot of sense... But all the old lifeboats had this hull, some even famous for its efficiency... But, speaking of modern hulls which may include up to catamaran hull, which type of hull would you choose in this condition?... :)
     
  4. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    I'd rather be in a RIB with my scuba gear, sound like a fun swim! :)
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Seeing it has to be powered by a relatively small diesel inboard constrains the choices.
     
  6. valter.f
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    valter.f Junior Member

    I really can not invest much. A diesel engine 18 hp would be my greatest availability. This is the reason a reliable hull. Here the weather can change suddenly and did not give enough time to arrive on the coast.
    Diving is a great idea. Sea blue, warm water and beautiful coral reefs here in Ubatuba, Brazil .... :)
     
  7. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Totally agree...the lines on that boat look great. A diesel engine might weigh it down though.

    [​IMG]

    I would suggest beefing up the transom and adding an outboard & fuel tanks midship to balance it out. You'll be jumping waves no problem.
     
  8. valter.f
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    valter.f Junior Member

    My intention is to build a skiff 25 feet, but one of only 20/21 ft could easily take a diesel engine like this weighing in at 250 kg: http://www.indumar.com.br/ver_produto.php?id=11&id_tipo=6&link=Yanmar&link2=Motores

    This Devlin boat (Chinoock 21) with this engine is a good example: http://store.devlinboat.com/chinook-21.aspx
     
  9. valter.f
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    valter.f Junior Member

    I really like Tolman skiff, had purchased the Renn Tolman book, but for those who do not speak English it is impossible to build it.
    Now I have the plans I bought the Glacier of Alaska, became everything a lot easier and I'll probably opt for this model, even with a
    small diesel engine or negotiate slightly higher, since it will be a small 25 ft open skiff.... Thank you all for your usual help..... :)
     
  10. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Welcome, Valter.

    Vamos tentar ajudar, se você tem dificuldade de tradução o livro.
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd go for something with full ends. You maximise your chances of staying upright, and there is no real penalty against it in a slow vessel.
     
  13. valter.f
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    valter.f Junior Member


    Efficiency: "full ends"?... Do you mean something like a whaleboat? A double-ended boat?... Sorry, friend... My english is very bad... :confused:
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    No, a boat with plenty of volume at the bows, which translates into fat waterlines and greater stability. Look at the lines of a typical ship's lifeboat, they are blunt ended for a reason. No need for slender entries in a slow displacement boat.
     

  15. valter.f
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    valter.f Junior Member

    Of course! ... Now I understand ... When did mension of a shipwreck, I was thinking a boat exactly like that. I also think it would be safer in a seaway and suitable for a small diesel engine. Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016
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