tiny cruising catamaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by jakobo, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. jakobo
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    jakobo Junior Member

    i have looked at diffrent designs regarding small multihulls. But they just dont fit the picture.
    does any one have ideas on a design for a small catamaran that would be big enough to have sleeping accomadation for 1 or 2 persons?
    my general idea was like 2 sharpies coupled together making the hulls with a small sleeping compartment.
    but how small could you go?
    u have looked at the slidercat design, and thougt about about making changes to that design to fit my wishes.
    just to clarify i have no experience designing boats, just sailing them.
    bassicly what i am looking for is.
    around 16ft
    prefereably no wider than 255cm
    and a sailing rig.
    any ideas?

    i hope that someone out there can help me find just the right design, or design just the right boat.

    last but not least i excuse for my english, since this is only my second language.
     
  2. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

  3. jakobo
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    jakobo Junior Member

    its a very interesting design, but i was actualy thinking smaller yet.

    i started looking on matt laydens micro cruisers, and ended up wanting to build a multihull in stead. just to give you an idea of the size i am thinking.
     
  4. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

  5. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I don't think you can go past the Jarcat.
    16ft long with a double berth and two singles.
    I had one and it was a very versatile small family boat , though no racer.
    Even then I know one chap who fitted his with a prodder, hiking racks and an assymetric spinnaker---and it went like the clappers.
    The biggest advantage of the Jarcat is that you can trail it without de-mounting or folding anything. It also has a big cockpit and motors very well with a small outboard.
     
  6. fng
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    fng Junior Member

  7. fng
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    fng Junior Member

    pictures
     

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  8. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber An Imaginary Member

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  10. rapscallion
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    rapscallion Senior Member

    I love this type of boat. Less time screwing around and more time sailing. That said, look at all of the designs, and pick the lightest one. I would also use as much beachcat hardware as possible.
     
  11. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    That is an outstanding little power(sail?) cat! The unpainted wooden version is a knockout! Thanks for the image and links...

    click on image:
     

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  12. rayaldridge
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    rayaldridge Senior Member

    I'd agree that Jarcats are good boats, though you don't want to push them in heavy weather.

    Zubian is a nice looking 18 footer, but I wonder about the hull beam-- it's almost 3 feet at the waterline, which mean it's not quite 6 to 1. I really believe that cats should be 10 to 1 if they want to be fairly fast.

    An 18 footer I like better is Weekender by Thomas Firth Jones.
     
  13. rapscallion
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    rapscallion Senior Member

    I like Jones' designs too. And I agree with your comment on the L/B ratio of the hull. The skinnier the hull, the more easily it's driven. The G32 has an L/B of 22 to 1. The Gougeons had wave piercing bows on their boats decades before they made it into the America's cup, and they were designing long and slender hulls before Nigel Irens...
     
  14. jakobo
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    jakobo Junior Member

    i absolutely love the miss cindy, but he hasnt made the drawing available for public.
    my second choise looks to be the jarcat. it has the right size a good weight and a nice look how ever the zubian also looks interesting, it just needs to shrink a bit.
     

  15. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

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