Tile-Clad Epoxy Paint ?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by mcollins07, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. mcollins07
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    mcollins07 Senior Member

    I have heard claims that most two part epoxy paints are very similar in performance and composition, even though their recommended useage my be different. I've also heard several boaters have used this Tile-Clad paint on their boat. The cost of this Tile-Clad seems very attractive.

    I'd like to hear from people who have used this Tile-Clad.
    What emperical data do you have from using it on boats?
    Has anyone used it for a primer? Has anyone used it for a barrier coat, or under the water's surface?

    ~ Michael

    Here's a description: http://protective.sherwin-williams.com/detail.jsp?A=sku-26222:product-6857
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Who did you hear the claims from? Read the technical data on several paints and you will see they vary a lot.
     
  3. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Unless the fact sheet said "Suitable for constant Immersion in Salt Water" (which is not on any of their fact sheets) you would be mad to put it below the waterline.

    The 'suggested applications' are
    RECOMMENDED USAGE

    For use over prepared substrates such as steel, galvanizing, and concrete in industrial environments.
    Laboratories
    Lavatories
    Masonry surfaces
    Power plants
    Offshore structures
    Schools
    Storage tanks
    Marine applications
    Structural & support steel
    Clean rooms
    Institutional kitchens
    Nuclear power facilities
    Chemical processing equipment
    Institutional & commercial wall coating
    Suitable for use in USDA inspected facilities
    Conforms to AWWA D 102-03, OCS #5
    Acceptable for use in high performance architectural applications.
     
  4. mcollins07
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    mcollins07 Senior Member

    crazy?

    @rwatson:
    I must disagree with your derogatory remark which might discourage would be posters. :) People whom apply products outside the manufactures recommend usage are typically far from “mad”, but are extremely rational. Even though by definition they are thinking outside the norm and thus may be considered “crazy”. So the “rational crazy” is exactly whom I’d like to hear from. I’d like to point out that these people should take pride in being called “crazy”. It is often an expression of excitement from smaller minds. The “rational crazies” provides a great service. Not only do they provide empirical information which is very difficult and costly to come by, but they provide mental stimulation to those who are very much in need. I enjoy learning from these crazies.


    On a bit more serious note:
    I was once a consultant to a company that had a relatively urgent need for low-cost holding tanks, which were to hold several hundred gallons of highly caustic aqueous solutions at a somewhat remote location. Their solution was tanks made of plywood, covered with polyester resin fiberglass applied with a chopper gun, then painted with this Tile-clad paint. I would classify this solution in the “rational crazy” realm. It is my belief that polyester resin would quickly lose its mechanical strength in a highly caustic aqueous solution. The paint was required to seal the caustic from the polyester in order to prevent a catastrophic failure of the tank. These tanks were used for approximately two years before the Tile-clad paint began to show peeling. Luckily, no one was injured and no spills occurred before these tanks were decommissioned.
     
  5. mcollins07
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    mcollins07 Senior Member

    Gonzo, I've paid attention to these type comments for many years, and do not remember the various sources. There was a discussion here on BD regrading the epoxy paints, only a few months ago, i think. However, I did a quick search and did not find the thread.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There are epoxy paint with and without solvent. Solvents can vary and they can include water.
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member


    I am very happy to discourage 'crazies' be they claim to be rational or not. When you have lived as long as I have, you tend to avoid the 'luck' factor, because you are old enough to realize that health and wealth are easily discarded for a few lousy bucks.

    How much do you expect to save over a proven, purpose built product ?
     
  8. mcollins07
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    mcollins07 Senior Member

    I have not chosen to use tile-clad for any future application at this time. I believe tile-clad is priced at about 50% of the price of epoxy resin. I do not know its price relative to paints for epoxy barrier coats and epoxy primers.

    I have used tile-clad to paint some book shelves, which is not its recommended usage. The shelves worked very well. They had to be left outside to dry for a longer period than other paints because of the fumes given off during curing. Over all, I was much happier with the tile-clad than I would have been using latex or oil based paint. I liked the hard smooth surface it provided. I felt secure that the cured epoxy paint would not come off and on to the books as latex or oil based paints might have. Those shelves were used for twenty five years and never harmed a book. :)

    I often apply products to purposes other than their recommended usage. However, cost is never the only considerations in such a choice. I’m not asking for help in making a decision for an application. I am asking for examples of real world experiences with this product. I find it to be an interesting paint. It seems to be widely available at a reasonable cost. I think a discussion of the decision process and strategies of applying products to non-recommended usage would be a separate thread and a very complex topic.
     
  9. mcollins07
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    mcollins07 Senior Member

    Gonzo, thanks for brining up the point about there are now two part epoxy paints with water as a solvent. I had not been aware of that. I’m still not aware of how you could have a two part epoxy without any solvent. Unless, perhaps you are referring to the powder coating systems.
     

  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Check out epoxy gelcoats.
     
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