Thoughts on mold waxing procedure

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by brokensheer, Jul 7, 2012.

  1. brokensheer
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    brokensheer Senior Member

    I have always hand waxed / removed mold release wax from a mold or plug. is anyone using a machine? and if so at what rpm. to keep from burning through the wax?

    We apply approx 7 coats with allowing the polished off surface to rest a bit before appling additional coats.
     
  2. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Far North Queensland, Australia

    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Power buffing - waxed molds

    Gooday 'broke' - I've been using a low-speed - power buffing - machine - - a Rupes brand (a tad expensive - 0h & not good value) paid $250.00 - 30 years ago & it still goes like it was brand-new. I've been in the FRP industry for 50 years now. It did get a real work-out - over the years & I picked it up just yesterday & did 4 hrs polishing with it. It is an Automotive Low Speed buff - doesn't burn the wax & polishes 25 to 1 over doing it by hand. Good luck with your tasks.

    By the way - after you put the wax on - you should wait for several minutes - for the solvent to come to the surface - before doing any polishing - - then when the job has been polished - again wait for several minutes for the rest of any residual solvent to come to the surface (you'll see it 'blush' on the surface) - then polish it up again - before applying another coat of was.
    I M H O - Ciao, james
     
  3. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    Please do source a datasheet on your wax, and see if your procedure meets that instructions in the datasheet.

    My experience:
    apply wax as thin as possible with a rag or applicator
    leave to blush off for 1 or 2 minutes (wax goes matte)
    break the surface with a clean cloth
    leave to cure for 15 minutes or so
    polish to a high shine, with a clean cloth. (another one than the previous)

    You will go through cloth like crazy, as they foul up pretty quickly, but at least the process is not tedious.

    Another option would be to look into semi permanents. So much easier to apply. (the one we have is a matter of wetting the surface with the semi-perm, then taking a fresh piece of paper and keep wiping the surface untill it is dry. 2x sealer and 1x release is all you need, then perhaps every 5 or 10 parts a new application of release.

    Appication of the release should be done by the people that demould the parts. They know when it is time for a new layer of release.
     
  4. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Herme - what are you on about - what is wrong with the KISS principle , Ciao, james
     
  5. brokensheer
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    brokensheer Senior Member

    James what do you use for a removal pad?

    Thanks Herman I will look it up!
     
  6. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    No truer words have been spoken . every part of the glassing process is critical and waxing is where it all starts , machine waxing and polishing no thank you ! Apply light and well rubbed in has worked for me for 25 yeras and im not about to change . all the rags you use are washable and when dried are usually better to use .:D:p:) .
     
  7. brokensheer
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    brokensheer Senior Member

    thanks always a great source of info !
     
  8. mastcolin
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    mastcolin Senior Member

    i am a painter by trade but am currently helping the mold makers. I also asked about why they use hand buffing "cos we always have" was the answer.

    I understand the "don't fix what ain't bust approach" but it seems kinda daft to me to be buffing up the wax by hand when a machine would do it way quicker. I wouldn't sand a 70footer by hand, why should I buff the mold wax by hand? (I thought wrapping rags around a convention mop head would do trick. It would allow you to use clean cloth every so often).
     
  9. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    why should I buff the mold wax by hand? ....cos you are then sure that it has all been done and done well, critical part of the process, and yes we used to do 80 footers by hand too
     
  10. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    23 meters, and waxed by hand with Meguiars M87
     

    Attached Files:

  11. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    28 metres and all done by hand hull and deck and fly bridge !!:)
     
  12. mastcolin
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    mastcolin Senior Member

    But surely you have a control step APPLYING the wax by hand. It goes cloudy/white so you see you have covered everything. Add in fact that we(you?) do it more than once then this step is weel controlled.

    My comment on machine was with the buffing to gloss, not application. A machine would do it quicker. If you missed a bit it would be still cloudy, so you would be able to see it.

    I am very willing to be persuaded of technical benefits of hand buffing but so far I haven't heard anything and machine buffing would be way quicker. What's the risk. (and I as I said I am all for don't fix what ain't bust but I am also aware of increasing cost constraints)
     

  13. jim lee
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    jim lee Senior Member

    Why take it off by hand? Because a buffer takes all the wax off you're trying to build up. We learned this lesson the expensive and hard way. It was the "Old timers" we hired later who explained what we were doing wrong and why. Never a problem since, knock on fiberglass.

    -jim lee
     
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