Thornycroft Navy Torpedo Boat - Peculiar Stern

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by FranV, Mar 13, 2021.

  1. FranV
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: Spain

    FranV New Member

    Hello


    I'm trying to make a naval model plan for a navy torpedo boat, built at the Thornycroft shipyard in 1886


    I have purchased the GA plans and NMM lines for that purpose.


    However I find myself stuck with the design of the stern, since it is a very particular type of stern.< Single tunnel Stern.> On the plane, the draftsman generalized the curves and they are very simple. With that detail it is very difficult to build the surface of the hull in that area. It is even difficult to interpret how the bilge surface varies towards the envelope of the propeller shaft, the stern and the vault that is created above the propeller.


    I have not found any reference to it, neither plans nor photos.


    From the double tunnel stern, double propeller I have found many references and pictures (Ariete, Coureur)


    Do any of you have a photo of a torpedo boat stern of this type? Or do any of you have a plan or sketch of what it would be like?


    I attach some lines of the design I´m with


    Thanks Stern ism.JPG Aft Stations.JPG Stern ism.JPG Aft Stations.JPG wl aft.JPG prof.JPG
     
  2. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    I can’t help you with your question, but I must say that the design is absolutely elegant, especially in comparison to what our Navy is building nowadays.
    How about showing us the bow as well?
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A small resemblance to some of those Atkins boats with the tunnel prop Everhope-2 large.gif
     
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  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

  5. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

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  6. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    Thanks for the pics, Will.
    Looks like the propeller is behind the rudder, flanking rudders?
    Without masts and superstructure, one could be pretty sneaky back in those days, a definite asset to a fast torpedo boat.
     
  7. FranV
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    FranV New Member

    Thank you all for showing interest. They are actually some wonderful and elegant lines In fact there is very little information on the aft constructive solution. Those photos are interesting. However, you should see some photos of the ship in the dock, showing the hull. I have bought several plans at the NMM. I'm also looking on ebay for some old postcard or photo, but still no result. The NMM collection does not have that aft detail and it is surprising because it was a large series of ships for the navy and for foreign navies. Thanks to all again
     

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  8. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    I understand a lot of the torpedo boats were converted to troop transport. Perhaps looking from that direction will yield better results.
     

  9. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    From what I see of the fragment of actual lines plan you posted, there is more than enough to reconstruct the stern hull framing and plating if you had it down on the loft floor and knew the plate thickness. However, with modern computer software....perhaps not so much. An experienced loftsman can pick out the tangents that don't show in the lines. In my career, I usually put in a tangent line when developing on the computer for ease of separating the simple plating from the developed edge radius. What software program are you using? That might suggest a solution.
    Additionally, this is the timeframe (early 1880's) John Isaac Thornycroft is conducting a lot of development (and litigation) over steering, propeller, and rudder arrangement and systems; which is what I see missing from the posted crop of the lines. Many hulls of nominally similar shape had very different stern appendages during this time of rapid development. Perhaps a UK patent search would be a better choice to show what is actually going on back aft with the prop and rudder.
     
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