This comes at a hefty price, but seems impressive.....

Discussion in 'Stability' started by Mr Efficiency, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    I have seen that video before, its more operator error than the boat. They should have stayed behind the wave a bit longer or gunned it when they realised they were in trouble. My neighbour crosses bars and fishes up to 100km offshore in his barcrusher 560 hardtop, I know 2 others that fish offshore and all of them rave about the barcrushers ride and seakeeping ability. The bass straight boats are local built here in bairnsdale although they may have moved to melbourne I think. They are based on formula hulls as far as I know. Exceptionally well built, most to survey.
     
  2. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    mr e you would like the cootacraft, built in mallacoota, they are missiles with rod holders. Some of them are running 425hp mercs on 19 ft hulls.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I might give them a ring, and see what make of boat it was, but it definitely wasn't a 233 derivative. If you see the live video of that boat going over, it was just too easy, for whatever reasons.
     
  4. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    Yes I have watched it. Any boat with a fat bum and fine bow will do that. It was completely operator error though. He could have gunned it and got away easy. He looked like he was panicking a bit the way he slowed right down then took off over the wave. The last place in the world for hesitation is an ocean bar crossing.
     
  5. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    That's the one place a sharkcat excels. I remember when i was a kid at lakes entrance watching an 18 ft sharkcat running along the breakers with 1 sponson either side of the wave crest. I was in awe and dreamed about owning a sharkcat when I grew up. Never did get one though. Maybe one day.
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I realise it was poorly handled, but they need to be more idiot proof, I do think they lack beam forward, and even in the tow, it nosedives, heavily, naturally it can't broach with all that tension on the towline.
     
  7. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    I agree with what you say but the fine nose is a compromise to get ride quality in a light hull. Surtees and some of the wa built alloy boats are similar. But there are so many barcrushers on the water with no problems I think that speaks volumes for them.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think the boats are probably too small to be self-drainers, it is an incremental loss of stability, which when you compound other things, like the lack of buoyancy forward, add up, on the wrong side of the ledger.
     
  9. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    The bigger ones are self draining don't know about the smaller ones. Definitely not to small. mates trailcraft 4.8 mt is self draining as are just about every ally made in w.a.
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know about trailcraft, but in a small boat, to be self-bailing, you want beam, and carried well forward.
     
  11. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    The Seakeeper gyros actively dampen roll motions. They are very effective at that when selected and installed properly and, hence, have experienced very good sales in spite of the price tag.
     
  12. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    I think they are way over the top and I would not want that weight in a small boat. Why put all that machinery in when form stability or flooding keels are just as good. I like things kept simple.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    They would come into their own when you are talking 7 metre or more, genuine deep vees 24* say. I don't know what the life expectancy or maintenance requirements might be.
     
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  14. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    A lot of vessel owners feel like you do; I tend to favor "simple and robust" on my own vessels. And a lot of owners are willing and able to afford various active motion control products. The success of Seakeeper is testament to that.
     

  15. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Brendan, simplicity is a matter of familiarity. A gyro is really pretty simple when you get down to it. It is certainly much simpler than a diesel, tranny, and prop. It does require a control system and some motion sensors, so there is a "black box" to contend with. But that aspect was sorted out in the '50s based on math that was sorted out 200 years before that. It's like saying you don't want a pendulum clock because of its complexity. It is probably simpler than the pumping system for a flooded keel; it doesn't require putting another hole in your boat; and it is probably easier to build one that will run for 30 years trouble free than it is to build a seawater pump that will run for 30 years trouble free. Honestly, simplicity is the one thing it has going for it.
     
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