This comes at a hefty price, but seems impressive.....

Discussion in 'Stability' started by Mr Efficiency, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member



    Not sure how easy to retro-fit, but some deep-vees would be a different boat with something like this.
     
  2. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    I saw one of these installed on a narrow beamed trawler to help with the rolling. I suppose if you have $15K (US) plus the installation costs to burn it would be a nice conversation piece. That's for the small Seakeeper 1, I didn't even look at the big ones.

    I do see it weighs the better part of 400 lbs and you'd better have a decent 12 volt power source on board as it's drawing 25 to 50 Amps.

    I'm going to support the Australian economy in a little different way. I want to pick up a Rainman watermaker over the next year or so for my trip down to the Florida Keys.

    At least if I get seasick I'll have plenty of fresh water so I don't get dehydrated.

    Amazing what you can buy these days isn't it? If you have the money.......
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I was wondering about the power draw, and as you say, 400lbs is not inconsiderable, but it seemingly makes a big difference. I would think if spending $150k on a trailerboat, which isn't unusual these days, it would have to be considered, and especially for commercial operators. Yes, if the money is available, there are new innovations galore.
     
  4. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Why not just use big ship antirolling fins?
    Or build a blimp. No rolling there.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is something of an advertisement for a power cat, that you need to pay 30k + to get a deep vee to behave similarly. Then again, the cat will cost as much more anyway, new. But, it is an interesting option, just not a cheap one.
     
  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It's curious they don't show it working in actual waves. Since it apparently damps that much wave energy, it has to counter exert that much energy through the deck to the hull. Some boats, it seems it would rip the deck out or rip out of the deck.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I remember seeing an old Formula 233 with a couple of ancient redband "tower of power" Mercury outboards, flopping around horribly when drifting beam-on over a fishing patch, I thought "how could you cop that". It was a combination of the 24 degree vee, the lightweight engines, and the short, steep chop. That was probably the best candidate I ever saw for such a stabilizer.
     
  8. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

    One of the nice features of the Seakeeper package is that it can be fitted to vessels for which the application of stabilizer fins is undesirable, impractical, or downright impossible.
     
  9. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    You don't want that weight or fins on a small boat. Flooding keels are the way to go. Simple.and reliable.
     
  10. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That idea has been around forever, of course, has some merit, but the barcrusher is not a well named boat, from some video I have seen.
     
  12. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    i have seen flooding keels in stejcraft ab boats in the 70's. seadevil is another. there have been plenty of them because they work. to say a barcrusher is not a good boat means you disagree with a lot of happy owners. they are popular and have a good rep down here where we have rough water.
     
  13. brendan gardam
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    brendan gardam Senior Member

    can you provide info on why barcrushers are not good mr e. i know its your right to put down everything as you are known for but you need positive proof that what you say is correct.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There was a video of one turning turtle on the Brunswick Heads bar, on youtube, not sure if still there, but it broached and went over too easily for my liking.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It was a few years ago, the boat that went out to recover it was the local air sea rescue boat, that looked like a Haines 243 or a Bass Strait 24, quite impressive boat, could have been diesel sterndrive. This video may not contain the actual incident where it capsized, but it does show the red rescue boat towing it back in, on plane, quite impressive, and that you might confirm is a barcrusher under tow, after being righted. Look from 9:00 onward. Forget the barcrusher, get one of those red boats, it might be a Bass Strait 24, but I couldn't be sure. :) It may be a different boat to what is currently sold as a "Bass Strait", it is a bit confusing the way names get swapped around. It would be easy enough to find out, I guess, by ringing the VMR there, but these days I think they have a RIB.

     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2020 at 4:10 AM
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