Third world wooden boat boat-yards?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by atavist, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. atavist
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    atavist New Member

    Just poking around and there is a good discussion on chinese GPR boat boat-yards on one of the other forums... any chance anyone knows of a good wooden boat boat-yard anywhere in the third world that does good work? I'd like to have a custom traditional wooden boat built but the cost of labor and wood is prohibitive in the US... I'd be willing to travel to any location world-wide to supervise the construction and take posession if I could find a place that could build the boat at a good cost savings over US boatyards.

    I know thailand was the place to go, still may be, but from what I'm hearing they have all gone GPR as well...

    thanks.
     
  2. jmolan
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    jmolan Junior Member

    http://fusionschooner.blogspot.com/

    I have been to this yard. Former US ex pat had a very good operation going. You can check him out here. Phillipines is very friendly and less costly place.


    http://www.boatshop.com.ph/


    However it looks like they are doing another amazing wood boat, and I do not know the managers or anything else.

    http://fusionschooner.blogspot.com/
     
  3. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    Before going anywhere, please also check the procedures to get the boat out of the country. This can give you a serious headache in some countries...
     
  4. bertho
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    bertho bertho

    hi,
    i'm the guy building the nigel irens schooner in the philippines, first basic decision is also if you want a boat who will fully comply with us regulation, to register your boat there later, cost will be increased as we need to import (taxes++) number of items from US, and have all survey ad hoc..
    i think for electric components/tanks/ hoses/ some systems parts, if you want to sail over the world with another flag, no problem, we can find most of equivalent and safe items on the local market, but it will be difficult to fully comply later with us regulations if the boat is built in a place like here... just a matter of decision, you can get get equivalent quality (or better here, as the cost for labour is less ) , supervision remain the heavy $$ point...!!
    cheer's
    bertrand
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well summed up Bertrand.
    May I add: >>hands on supervision<< is the clue! Just telling the local shipwright how you like it is rarely enough (as you know pretty good).
    Classification is not that big a problem (when you choose the class. body carefully), but of course adds a substantial amount on the heavy side. In China it is easy to have it IACS classed. Without classification one may find some difficulties to get the boat registered in western countries (flag states).

    Regards
    Richard
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    What makes you think that building a boat is the US is much more expensive? Compare equal quality and up to standards equipment instead of only price and you will see that the savings are not that great. Also, in Third world countries, you will get little or no legal protection on your investment. In my experience the boats built there are poor and have a short life.
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Though you´re not really wrong here, you´re not completely right also.
    It IS possible to get a first class quality done in Asia (even better than in the US). It IS far cheaper (due to the enormous difference in labour cost). Both is proven several thousand times.

    But, of course, when you are not familiar with the country, not a skilled pro yourself, the chance to get your project screwed in a moment is enormous!

    When was "Philanderer" built? Almost 15 years ago or so?

    Regards
    Richard

    And:
    When the cost of wood in the US is already too high for you (it is the cheapest worldwide in general), you will probably not get happy abroad too! Maybe just one step down in size, or the second hand market solves that problem.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That is one good thing about the US, used boats are very cheap. Hong Kong yards where great, but were run by British management. In Taiwan there are a couple of good US run yards. The legal protection in minimal or nonexistent though. That is always a major concern. The language and cultural barrier is hard to bridge. For an American, expecting people to work when they have been paid is a given, but it doesn't always work like that overseas.
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Do´nt forget the German management in many many yards in Asia!
    And of course, US and European people assume to get what they paid for, which never works in Asian driven workshops of any kind. They are used with low quotations to get a order and negotiate again later to earn money.
    But once you have a proper running business there, you can have very good quality at substantially lower prices. The control is the trick as Bernard stated above.


    Regards
    Richard
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I agree about foreign management in Asia. However, I would not call them Third world. To me, Third world setup, would be going to a yard in Bangladesh or Senegal
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    When doing business there (as I do) you revaluate some countries pretty soon. And some even develop back, like Turkey.

    Richard
     
  12. Alik
    Joined: Jul 2003
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    Alik Senior Member

    Third World - what it that? Sounds offensive to anyone who lives and works here.
     
  13. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    The thread opener surely did not mean that offensive, so did´nt Gonzo or I. Though for the average Usanian every country except "gods own" is third world.
    Do´nt ask for my personal opinion Albert. When it comes to several Asian countries (and Asia starts at the Bosphorus), my personal view (based on experience), will offend, I´m sure.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  14. Alik
    Joined: Jul 2003
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    Alik Senior Member

    I know a lot of stories about building boats in Asia as well :)
    But on other hand, this happens in US :D
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well Albert, you´ll find them hardly as stupid in Thailand! I know that story and still cannot believe how one would be able to make such 5 storey house on a ten times lengthened boat. And it was reported that these guys are teachers! Poor children, born to loose................
     
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