The mythical 50 knot barrier

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by oab, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. oab
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    oab Junior Member

    Sailing: The mythical 50 knot barrier

    (This post have also been posted under Sailboats & Multihulls).

    I have been doing a field study (in terms of hydro and aerodynamics) on G-Class vessels for ocean records, and are about to cover the mythical 50 knot barrier over 500 meters.

    Do some of you know of an "A-Z book" that addresses this problem in specific? I want to get an overview of existing articles which I can start of with before digging into the depths to understand why nobody have been able to overcome the relativly low average speed compared to the fastest motorized vessels?

    Perhaps some of you also have been philosophizing about this for a while, and even been experiencing with it? I would be happy to listen to your thoughts, and I've also noticed that several of you are widely read and have the knowlegde to hopefully contribute to this post.

    All technical perspectives and thoughts about the theme to "demystify" the topic is very welcome.

    Thanks you,
    OAB
     
  2. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    The WW2 German E-boat (displacement hull) was

    designed with the 50 knot barrier in mind.

    It was based on a big fast yacht built in the '30s by some rich German.

    I vaguely remember that it was the 'perfect' hull design in that it was the smallest hull that could approach the 50 knot barrier efficiently while still handling rough seas, doing both at the same time that is. I remember reading about how it was the 'correct' hull given the density, viscosity of salt water/air and earth's gravity. Can't remember what the diff would have been if it was fresh water design, or for higher or lower gravitation but it sounded like they knew what they were talking about.
     
  3. oab
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    oab Junior Member

    Hi and thanks for you answer, Squidly-Diddly. The E-boat is a very fascinating vessel taking its age into concideration. Just saw a 1/72 scale model radio controlled racing around. High speed for such a vessel... I think the "Cables & Wireless Adventurer" is faster in all terms being a more modern design for records. A new boat called "Earth Race" is also the same class, but haven't made any official records yet.

    However, I think I have been a bit vague in my post as I am refering to sailing vessels such as Hydroptere, Groupama 3, Orange 2, Alex Caizergues and Finian Maynard. Sorry about that. As a new user to the forum I will therefor have to ask if I have addressed my post in the wrong category and / or if this post should have been placed in another category to get more interest?


    Thank you in advance,
    OAB

    PS! If you can help me further, Squidly-Diddly, I would be very greatful for that.
     
  4. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I googled "G-class vessels" and got something about

    the next gen of massive container ships, not little experimental sailing hydrofoils, so I thought you were asking for fast, load carrying displacement hulls.
     

  5. oab
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    oab Junior Member

    Sorry about that. G-Class (Giant-Class) is a term used within sailing on vessels used for the Outright Records such as the 24 hours, Transpac and Transat, The Jules Verne Trophy and so on, which is not bound by rules regulating size of vessel, number of crew, design of vessel, etc.

    Do you know if this is the category to address this post, or should it be moved to another one such as "Sailboats"?

    Thanks,
    OAB
     
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