The motorsailer: Not good at anything or just a motorboat with sail?

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by gunship, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    I was 14 at the time, sheltered from the ugly aspects of life. I trusted and respected adults, as I was raised to. :)
    I didn't mention, the man was a black man. It didn't matter then, or to the story now. I respected ALL adults.
     
  2. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Nothing like good cotton t shirts in hot weather, especially good if you wet them down. However when working with fiberglass, especially the sanding stage I like to suit up in those lightweight hooded disposable coveralls. Cheaper to buy a big air conditioner than cotton lined denim. :)
    No thank you on that flywheel splitter --man thats a dangerous looking piece of gear, My hydrolic unit does just fine .
     
  3. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Working with FRP I powder myself all over with corn starch.
    Look like the Pillsbury dough boy, but keeps the fibers off my skin and out of my pores, and everything goes down the shower drain when I'm done.
     
  4. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Corn starch as applied to the human body has it's uses but this is the first time i heard of sanding fiberglass as one of them :p

    P.S. Just come in for a cup of tea--heavy rains last night but now a beautiful day here about 70F--Geo.
     
  5. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Try it. A box of Argo is cheap. :D
     
  6. Wavewacker
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Yobarnacle, thanks for the offer, please let me know I like that one.

    I have a few long sleeve Ts, keeps the son off too. But I do like wet T shirt contests as a spectator. :cool:
     
  7. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    1 person likes this.
  8. boat fan
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Australia

    boat fan Senior Member

    Great link Sam......

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    Amazing photos in that link Sam Sam ....thank you !
     
  9. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK, I have always wondered about this one question in regards to the junk.

    The flat stern, even though raised above waterline, could lend itself to some interesting behavior when riding big following waves.

    Am I correct in that? So, would the junk be a much better fair weather sailer, a better cruiser near shore?
     

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  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    >The flat stern, even though raised above waterline, could lend itself to some interesting behavior when riding big following waves.<

    Not really as the wide broad stern has good lift so a big following sea will not crash aboard.

    In England the Brixham trawlers work in heavy weather with no hassles.

    The big booster of a full transom stern was Maurice Griffiths who designed many hundreds of boats of this style.

    He published many books and they are still great reads , to today he would be doused with fuel and burned alive by the PC crowd.

    Sailboat designs of Maurice Griffiths by year - Sailboatdata.com
    sailboatdata.com/view_designer.asp?designer_id=71‎
    Maurice Griffiths. 1902-1997. Maurice Griffiths photo. www.eventideowners.org.uk. After World War II, no one, in the English speaking world, did more to make ...
     
  11. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Doesn't look like a fair comparison to my eyes.
     

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  12. boat fan
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Australia

    boat fan Senior Member

    Yes , Fred is right there , lots of buoyancy aft , that stern will ride over following seas like a duck...

    [​IMG]

    The junks had a large , straight stern to enable a straight rudder post to be lifted up vertically.When the rig is swung outboard , there is a significant force on the hull to round up , so the rudder is large.

    [​IMG]

    I have no idea why this picture is so large ! Apologies ! LOL.
     
  13. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    You can upload thumbnails instead.
     
  14. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    I agree with RWatson.

    And I think a following sea would be much more difficult for the junk, since most of the have an extremely small bow. - greater buoyancy to push up, out, and over a small bow, I would think.

    But I have never ridden one, much less in heavy seas.

    Would they use more rocker to offset the huge stern?

    wayne
     

  15. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The junks were used in trade following the monsoon season.

    They are downwind sailors , so one would think in 5000 years or so, the folks that used them got downwind just right.
     
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