The game is afoot

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Boston, Apr 20, 2011.

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  1. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    only thing thats mine in there so far is the floor and a pile of tools, OK that and a beer fridge

    Got a bunch of new lines on the floor today, started the new station sections and added a station in between 1 and 2 for collision insurance. Also going to get silly and loft in both the cockpit floor and the forward section floor as well as a few other particulars.

    cheers
    B
     
  2. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Well the beer fridge shows you have your starting priorities in order :) Geo.
     
  3. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,300
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer


    See my drawing...... View attachment Bronchobulkheads.pdf

    The fowardmost plywood bulkhead (7" forward of station 1 and 1'10" aft the stem face) will be your collision bulkhead.......once you have the new bulkheads lofted you can loft the inside and outside of the stem and forefoot, then draw some sections through it and laminate it up.....
     
  5. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Ya I went with your layout of the new bulkheads, and figured that first one was waterproof but included one more between 1 and 2 cause I've seen one to many guys hammer the dock trying to park. If your feeling strongly against it I can always just skip it. I'll work out ventilation and access to the area.

    The bulk of the bulkheads :D are lofted ( I'm a "tad" :D ahead of schedule on the lofting ) and it should be done tomorrow. I'll start in on the cedar ply soonest. I was thinking of using an edging around the bulkheads of cedar or walnut as well ( most likely cedar ) maybe another 5/8 either side 1 1/4 total by say another 1 1/4 in. That way the cedar ply could sit in a groove ( lotsa glue area ) and the edging would provide a larger contact area ( less pressure ) for the hull, also keeps the edges up out of the bilge. Just some thoughts, if your feeling strongly against any of them just holler.

    Oh hey in post 132 I detailed a slight change to the keel, don't suppose you could review that post and tell me what you think :cool:.

    while I've got you handy, I know your busy with your own project, I found an engine that I kinda like. Taking your advice to keep the power down near hull speed, Its basically 16x16x20 and weighs in at 130lb. Yanmar 13.4 hp marine http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=310155673438 &item=310155673438#shId but I am concerned that in high wind or rough water 13 hp wont be enough. also found this one http://cgi.ebay.com/CUMMINS-DIESEL-...pment_Parts&hash=item2c4be496e8#ht_1403wt_702

    just made an offer on this one
    Yanmar 2002 model 4TNE84
    not sure if its still available though
     
  6. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Ok got the rest of the stations the top sides and the transom, I'm going to guess the hull wont be more than say 3/4 thick and go with that on the take off. should be gluing stuff up tomorrow.

    cheers
    B
     
  7. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I doubt your keel change will be noticeable in the boat's handling......The open Hand version was trying to provide clean water to the prop and full protection to the prop and rudder heel.....to do that on your version will require an elaborate bracket type skeg iron (from the aft bottom corner of the keel down to the rudder heel bearing) The old style straight line keel was for ease of hauling on a carriage or drying grid, it's not necessary these days as everyone uses travellifts.............

    More power means you will be able to go at speed uphill in rougher weather.....That little Cummins looks pretty nice but it seems to be a stationary engine intended for a generator? Do these things still have fixed RPM governors? You need a variable speed unit for a boat.....also the cooling problem......are you going to build a water-cooled exhaust manifold? In my experience Yanmars are expensive, vibrate a lot, and they're noisy......Kubota, Isuzu, Nisan, Cummins.....all smoother and quieter.....A friend has a new little D1 Volvo (without turbo) which seems to be a beauty though very expensive......You want something that puts out the required power at around 2000-2400 RPM max, less would be better.....
     
  8. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Sounds like I can loose the extra draft then. I didn't hear back from anyone on the engines I was looking at so looks like once again I'll be pursuing another rout. The little Yanmars are available but if your thinking they aren't all that smooth then I'll look into the options you suggest and see what I can find.

    Kubota, Isuzu, Nisan, Cummins
    cheers.

    ps
    haven't had this much fun in years
     
  9. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

  10. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    today was kinda a wash, no real progress just double checking the drawing ( corrected a few minor things ) and got some stuff to get started.
     
  11. Lurvio
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Mid of Finland

    Lurvio Mad scientist

    Double checking is good, I sometimes forget (or get lazy) and mistakes get made.

    Was i right about that one offset point being wrong? Waterline 2 at St4 (if my memory still works).

    Lurvio
     
  12. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    I found several that were slightly off and if I remember that was one of them.
     
  13. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    milled out a bunch of cedar for the bulkheads today, 5/16 strips, lots of sawdust. tomorrow I have to work on something that makes me money but I should have time to glue up a bulkhead or two, was hoping to get to that today but it took me a while to find descent cedar, something about "no I don't was fence material grade" that seemed to throw people off. Clear select western red cedar was for some reason a rare bread in this town.

    cheers
    B
     
  14. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Bellingham WA

    cthippo Senior Member

    Wait, how are you doing the bulkheads that you need strips? :confused:
     

  15. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Diagonal laid strips of cedar 5/16 each, 5/8 total thickness with a inside and outside cord of 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 black walnut. Cedar ply will be rabbeted into the walnut same as a TJI. Tad suggested the cedar ply and I figured that an inside and outside cord would add about zilch to the total weight and considerably in strength. I'll post picts of the first few soonest. Ends up looking sorta like this

    at least in section

    [​IMG]
     
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