the deck on my Pearson Ensign

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by LeRi222, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, this would be a start (though I'd move the belly of the ellipse up a tad), but separating the rudder from the keel is the next really big step up. Rudders with that much post rake will get "hard mouthed" with wind strength and heel. Most use it as a guide to get a reef in the main.

    A spade rudder, with a straight shaft or a skeg hung rudder are the ways to go to really improve the handling of this type of assembly. On your Dory, the rudder shaft on a spade or skeg hung, would come up about where the inclined shaft does now, so no major rebuilding. I'd try to move it aft as far as practical (right at the bulkhead most likely) to offer more leverage as your Dory doesn't have a whole lot of tiller to work with. In fact. most that I know with one have used a longer tiller.
     
  2. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Hmmm. There was an article a few months ago in SAIL magazine that discussed the pros and cons of keel/rudder configurations and I seem to remember that the author felt that a keel with attached rudder set-up was less effective (albeit not structurally) than a spade or separate skeg/rudder configuration.

    I'm not inclined to perform major surgery on a boat that I've already spent two years working on, but I do have a spare silicon bronze rudder shaft that could be fitted with a differently shaped rudder. If I understand correctly, you would move the elliptical shape of the Ensign rudder upward and give it more of a Pearson Triton rudder shape, correct?

    I also have a longer laminated oak/mahogany tiller that I could install, as the original teak tiller seems to be a little on the lightweight side.

    I'll try reefing the main and using a larger headsail first to see if it helps.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 27, 2013
  3. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Photos of Cape Dory 22 #161 - sailing at last!

    Some shots of the boat on her maiden voyage (for us, at least). Please excuse the quality of the photos - they were taken by one of our teenage Eagle Scouts with a SmartPhone from the deck of an aluminum fishing boat on a windy day.
     

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  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Worth all the cussing wasn't it . . . looks great, congratulations.
     
  5. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Definitely worth the time and effort. This is the biggest project I've tackled so far, having previously redone sailing dinghies and catamarans. I've certainly learned quite a few things, particularly what's important and what's not so important, and how easy it is to get bogged down in minute details.

    I won't devote near this much time to the Paceship PY23. Fortunately, there's not much if any fiberglass work or hull painting needed and there are things that I can farm out such as woodwork which any competent carpenter can handle offsite.

    It will be interesting to see how they sail against each other, being different in almost every way. Deep full keel wineglass shaped boat with slightly larger headsail and an inboard rudder vs. shoal draft keel centerboard boat with a smaller high aspect main and larger headsail and a transom hung rudder. The PY23 is 23% (2460 vs 3200) lighter with 8% (223 vs. 240)less sail area using a 100% jib on each boat, so it would appear to be the faster boat, but I'm sure that's over simplifying things.

    Then there's the 1965 Ensign. Part of me says spend my time on simpler projects, and part of me says I've already put a good deal of time and effort in it, it's a great training boat with that huge cockpit, and that I should finish it. Now that we have one boat sailing and another well on the way, I can afford to take my time.
     
  6. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Definitely worth it! We took it out this past Saturday in 10 to 12 knots of wind and I had time to tune the rig a little and try different sail combinations to minimize the persistent weather helm. Hanked on a 140% genoa in place of the working jib and the turbo kicked in! We could sail with the toerail almost under, and the boat tracked straight and was nice and balanced, even with a kid who had never sailed before at the helm. I'm really going to enjoy this boat!
     
  7. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Work continuing on the PY23. The wooden rudder head and tiller were toast so I laminated a new rudder head from two pieces of MDO plywood to 1-1/4" thick, used the old rudder head for a template and cut out a new one. There was some slack in the rudder blade pivot so I installed a bronze sleeve bushing over the blade pivot bolt.

    I laminated a new double curved 40" long tiller using altenating layers of red oak and white fir and applied Honey Teak polyurethane finish. The contrasting layers of the plywood edges and the red oak/white fir turned out very nice.

    Next up, replace the galley top/companionway step, cut out and replace a soft area in the bottom of the fore cabin bulkhead, test and replace any wiring/switches/nav lights. On and on and on.....
     
  8. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    With the CD22 launched and sailing, and the PY23 well on the way, I been brainstorming our next project boat.

    I've attached a sketch of a proposed wooden brigantine (OK - Hermaphrodite Brig, if we want to be technical) that could be built in my barn, with help from some of the dads.

    I envision 2x4 framing, plywood planking and decks, metal encased in concrete for exteral ballast, self draining cockpit(s) a small cuddy (forecastle) for a portable toilet and storage, an outboard in a well, and wheel steering (for looks), laminated fir spars, and galvanized or stainless standing rigging with deadeyes, etc. In short, rough but simple and sturdy. Sail area of 236 sq. ft. in the fore and aft sails, plus 95 sq.ft. in the square sails (mostly for downwind work) should move it along. Furling the square sails is always a challenge in something like this, but maybe tracks on the yards per Sam Rabl's Polaris or lowering the fore course to the deck and the topsail to the crosstrees would work.

    I'm sure folks are going to ask "why bother with all this", when a sloop, ketch, or schooner would be simpler. The answer is: we have a CD22, a PY23, a Pearson Ensign, and 2 Hobie 16's and a Sunfish, so simple is covered. This would be something with "plenty of strings to pull" for a group of young scouts, would be operated on a fresh water lake.

    OK, I've thrown it out there so please give me some feedback, hopefully in a way that addresses concerns and offers suggestions, but doesn't write me off as a total lunatic.

    Regards, Seasailor
     

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  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is one of my designs and though not the Brig you where hoping for a lot easier to sail, on the length you'd like.

    [​IMG]

    Square courses require a significant crew and some coordination. Furling and reefing are also issues, but they can be handled. Do you have plans for this sketch?
     
  10. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    What build method is this for home build par. Do you use strip planking for your round bilge plans.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Strip plank, cold molded or glued lapstrake . . .
     
  12. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Thanks. The glued lap would look terrific with that rig.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Glued lapstrake looks good on everything . . . I'm thinking of new glued lap fenders on my Suburban . . .
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Maybe you fit a short gaff rig on the roof and a bow cannon on the bonnet. I can picture the s s par cruising downtown with the skipper wearing a patch and stuffed parrot on your shoulder. What a chick magnet. ;)
     

  15. seasailor55
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Gorgeous schooner Paul! Very classy and the draft is just right for our lake. Sparred length would be around 30', right? Is that an outboard or a Saildrive?Cold molded or glued lapstrake. Very pretty, but out of our league, I'm afraid.

    The furling, reefing, and coordination issues would be OK in something this size, and would actually be desirable for the purpose. For shorthanded sailing, the squares could be furled and it would essentially be a staysail schooner.

    No, I don't have plans for the sketch. I drew it myself, basically a big skiff with keel, deck and rig added. The upper topsides are intended to create somewhat of a tumblehome effect and make it look more like a small ship. I've omitted the usual fake gunports.

    There could be two versions: A daysailer with dual cockpits and a small cuddy, or an overnighter with a low cabin roof over the forward cockpit. Foam below the cockpit floors and in both ends could provide flotation.

    Does the rig look proportionate, and would this shape have enough stability for work in sheltered waters, assuming some common sense regarding shortening sail?
     
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