the Cost of Cruising

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, Sep 24, 2017.

  1. dsigned
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    dsigned O.R.C. Hunter

    I think of the Wharrams more in terms of cost per (insert metric here) than as a direct competitor. Not that they're actually that much cheaper, but the lack of deck structure (and the lashed together hull design) probably offers some savings over a similarly sized cat, and offers a bit more "cruise" than a lot of other cats that lack bridgedecks. I think that someone could, in theory, out-Wharram Wharram. It seems that there is room for improvement on the design, even taking into consideration some of the different design goals (the preference for longitudinal over lateral stability, manageability of the rigging over speed, etc.), but from what I can tell, the market for low-cost cruising multihulls isn't terribly large, so it's not a market that's terribly attractive to competitors (especially those who don't find his design choices compelling).
     
  2. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    ".... offers a bit more "cruise" than a lot of other cats that lack bridgedecks ...... "

    .... whatever THAT means. Actually, "the market for low-cost cruising multihulls isn't terribly large" for low-cost cruising multihulls cats/tris/proas etc is HUGE. Do a tour of all the small pacific islands and Asian islands and check out the "native" craft. There are probably more home made multi-hulls than any other craft in the world in sheer numbers when you think about it.

    The thing is, they are all made of local resources, and don't get analysed, insured, warranteed and repaired by "professionals" because they cant afford professional help.

    Wharram used a few design "features" from these "amateur" builders, and so adopted the design limitations of native craft, which really wasn't necessary, but appealed to the "back to nature" crowd.

    With about the same amount of the modern materials as Wharram uses, people like Derek Kelsall get a lot more value for the boat owner.
     
  3. Chuck Losness
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    Chuck Losness Senior Member

    The cost of cruising has so many variables that it is impossible to pin down. When I was cruising in Mexico there were boats cruising on $500 or less per month to boats that were spending thousands of $$$$ per month. I never added up my total annual expenses. I was at the low end of the scale. My basic living cost was 4000 pesos (approximately $350) per month. This was just living expenses. It included some minor repairs but nothing major. It did not include slips, haulouts, major repairs, new sails, etc. I anchored out most of the time. My best guess is that I was spending around $700 to $800 per month for everything.
    The cruisers with the simplest, smaller boats seemed to have the lowest annual costs. Costs increased dramatically as boat size and complexity increased.
     
  4. Phil Christieso
    Joined: Jun 2016
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    Phil Christieso Junior Member

    001.jpg 007.jpg Maybe it should be the cost of NOT going cruising most people are being farmed just like sheep and cattle maybe more like sheep.
    Looking in from outside the farm it doesn't look good.

    It's only because of Lynda's thorough book keeping over the last 25 years that you gain a good average of the cost.
    E.g. 1994 - 2002 $6,000us per year 43' boat plus 2 children.
    2009 - 2017 $13,000us per year same boat no kids
    Our spending has increased partly because our income has increased
    This only shows you what the cost of cruising can be - We have never ran out of rum.
     
  5. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    groper Senior Member

    This is GOLD!!! I love it, could not be more true... (not inclusive of everyone of course but for a large part of the population most definitely)
     
  6. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Same ....
    When analysing the typical suburban landscape(like my street) there's so many on the treadmill- couple cars on finance- mortgage/rent... dream appliances that last 5-10 years... maybe it's the price that society pays so the few can escape, I look back at my live aboard days with no mailbox or bills to arrive in & limited solar plus petrol & kero it was like heaven;)
    Jeff.
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    You guys are priceless :)
    Especially Mr W "I look back at my live aboard days with no mailbox or bills to arrive in & limited solar plus petrol & kero it was like heaven"
    Oh, you "look back". You bet you look back, cause NO ONE actually enjoys long term on the boat. Just look at the number of boats for sale.

    Living on a boat is the pits - especially a SMALL boat. Stuck inside a shoebox for days on end when the weather is bad, constantly waiting for the wind to drop, and the swell to ease off. In the tropics is HOT, and if not, its COLD, and you have to keep traipsing back and forth for the LPG or fuel container, and the water.

    But keep it up - there are lots of poor dudes needing to get rid of their "best days", and we need more suckers for the industry.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Most boats are sold because they don't get enough use to justify the expenses, not because people got sick of being aboard, surely.
     
  9. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Same ....
    When analysing the typical suburban landscape(like my street) there's so many on the treadmill- couple cars on finance- mortgage/rent... dream appliances that last 5-10 years... maybe it's the price that society pays so the few can escape, I look back at my live aboard days with no mailbox or bills to arrive in & limited solar plus petrol & kero it was like heaven;)
    Jeff.
    Right on Mr "E"... I'm starting to like this, most are time poor because they are locked in to the realities of ordinary life. Whether that's good, bad or indifferent is up to them or how they might perceive such and in life we all have choices the range of which they don't necessarily have control over. In our wealthy country we are very lucky with very little chance of going hungry etc. so without too much effort & with at present a nearly endless array of cheap second hand vessels I'd say that living aboard is still a great option.
    The years I did were very successful as mostly based in Sydney with a beautiful temperate climate, the local Maritime lady turned a blind eye and the days where weather affected were few, my wife needed to be dolled up as a Macquarie Street practice manager on a daily basis & if raining would get sorted at shore facility, back then I worked at a boatyard not ar away.... Like anything in lie to be successful you need to work at it.. pity the wage slave on a serious commute & putting in a fair day cant be distracted by a stroll to the shop/bank/petty & then catch/buy some dinner, go for a surf/sail/whatever & bbq up with a wine or two & enjoy the tranquility to wake to a new day...
    All the best to All from Way-Kickin.
     
  10. groper
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    groper Senior Member

    spoken like a true land lubber Watson- now go and pay your taxes, rates, registrations, mortgage interest, license fees, energy bills etc etc ... then willingly receive your bar code on your forehead by our nanny state, carry around the smart chip in your wallet, live on the garbage drip feed from the media and politicians, work your *** off so 50% of your efforts goes to propping up welfare and the rest of the bureaucracy that constitutes our "way of life"...
    There choices other the same shoe box which never moves, always has the same view out the window and never expands your horizons. These cost of cruising is dependant on your perspective in life, monetising this cost is unique to every situation, person and location - so its a silly question in general, hence a better question would be a philosophical one about the real cost of NOT cruising and the things youll miss out on if you stay at home in your bubble within the matrix ... Red pill or blue pill, the choice is yours Neo :D
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It won't be long before the bureaucrats will have the drones hovering over your get-away boat, wherever you take it, so they can better tax the backside off you. :eek:
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    yeah, yeah - you cant con me because I been there. There's not a boatie in the world (that is earning money ) that isn't paying taxes, rates, Insurance ( don't get me going about BOAT Insurance), maintenance, repairs blah blah blah ....

    You're either bobbing around in a backwater living on benefits , or getting charged at a Marina, paying double what it'd cost you of you had your own non-rocking piece of real estate.

    My box has more windows than yours - in fact I am looking straight out at you boat now with my Internet eye. Your window is just about the same as every other boat, water - and its either smooth or rough. After all these years, its just water, and it looks a lot better from land.
     
  13. groper
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    groper Senior Member

    Sitting in a marina or bludging up a river isn't cruising... if that's what your doing with your boat - then you've already long swallowed the blue pill and living in blissful ignorance!
    All I can say is - I much prefer my view from OUT THERE - and i cant wait to make the next episode;
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Do you still have the boat, groper ?
     

  15. groper
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    groper Senior Member

    Not that one... the next is imminent however - have a few options I'm contemplating - all of them have sails :D
     
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