That old question, new guy wants to build boat, what's it cost, really?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Beer Womb, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. Beer Womb
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Beer Womb New Member

    As you've probably guessed, I've never built a boat before but those images on google of "40 foot sailboat" have got me gushing and my stupid little head has the idea in it to build a sailboat. A big one. Haha! No experience whatsoever, gonna go straight for gold.

    I'll make a little extra note here just to quell your fears that I'll be back on here in a month asking about how to put a car engine in a boat, and say that I'm actually a former nuclear engineer, which honestly isn't as fancy as it sounds but Ive seen my share of 'complicated' stuff before and I'm pretty sure I could handle this. Or at the very least, learn my lesson after being humiliated!

    So ok, after I get some books, gougeon brothers on boat construction, whoever those guys are, and I do all my homework, thinking about the realities of naval architecture and construction and so on, and I accept that it's gonna cost like 50 times more than I'd planned or hoped, what am I left with?

    Am I really going to build a boat? Or is it a stupid idea, meant for real enthusiasts and professionals?

    I really want to know if this is something I can do as a hobby. More than a hobby. To challenge myself, because I think building a sailboat is going to be an epic saga of problem solving and frustration. And I love that. Nothing but this, until its done. Would I be proud? Over my head? I bet sailing a vessel YOU built might just be as awesome as watching your child being born. (Maybe you could finally relate to your wife, having to do all the work!)

    so here are my real questions:

    1. Will it be rewarding? Fun?

    2. Ok honestly haha how much will it cost me? 35-45 foot monohull, wood?

    3. After I build it, and let's say I manage to do an ok job, does it have value? Would I be able to sell it, and at least break even, or would it always have the stigma of being built by "some guy" in his back yard? Maybe a business? haha!

    I appreciate all your feedback guys, thanks!

    -Beer Womb
     
  2. Butch .H
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    Butch .H Senior Member

    Yup that being built by "some guy" in his back yard is going to stick.Not for no reason .You should see some of the crap people can come up with.Build your boat it is fun rewarding and painfull. If you are building to sell you are doing it for the wrong reason.That is unless that is your business.If you want a estmate of value try insure the boat:D
     
  3. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    masalai masalai

    First, consider where you plan to cruise, and then
    Do you intend to be "marina dependant" - - or - - self sufficient...
    Shelter from stormy weather up a creek - - or - - putting out to sea and run away of "weather the storm"
    Travel solo or a select few (girlfriend children etc) - - or - - round the buoys or short passage racing
    Do you intend to cruise globally - - or - - make foreys cruising the local region during annual leave etc..
    There are lots of other questions to answer before considering will the boat be a mono/cat/tri/trailer-borne and so forth, then size, build material then the design and support to get it built PROPERLY....

    Read this "case study" - - - Build yourself a boat and do a lap, crazy or not? and don't follow in those footsteps....
     
  4. eponodyne
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    eponodyne Senior Member

    Generally speaking, figure on about five to eight dollars a pound before you can start shakedown cruises. This is why, to a point, light boats cost less. Don't go thinking you're going to reinvent the wheel. Just buy the plans for a Bruce Roberts 38 and follow them exactly.
     
  5. Beer Womb
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    Beer Womb New Member

    Alright, I suppose it boils down to, is there any real reason why people build their own boats?

    Aside from that idea of having built it yourself, is there any other financial benefit or whatever?

    I may as well just take a look at the used market, eh?
     
  6. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Now that has to be a good opportunistic idea. - don't forget to have it surveyed first by someone professional whom you can trust....? caveat emptor...
     
  7. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Beer Womb -



    It is a big challange. You can buy plans though. If you're new to boating, do make a couple of trips first.

    Some things are simple, others are very complicated (wait till you meet Tom Speer :D)
    It is going to take a lot of time, more than you think.
    It is expensive and then some.
    it is more work than you think it is, probably about 10 x more.
    Expect to get divorced :D , well, at least a few times :D

    This must be something you really really r e a l l y realy want to do. I suggest you find out more and a lot more, but don't do anything for six months. If you still really reallly really want to do it... well, have the head examined :D

    I can also warn you now that once you start building these bloody things, and even if you swore never never ever again, expect it to happen all over again ;)

    Did I mention it is expensive ? Go to a shop and see what the stuff price.

    Yes, it is very satisfactory, rewarding, not many do it themselves.

    If you can stick it out, do it right, then you have something.
     
  8. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Oh yeah, I forgot to mention. One defenate way to financial ruin is to build a boat AND go into fishing :D

    Damn, I haven't started on my cat and I'm thinking of another one already :D I need help. Heeeelp :rolleyes:
     
  9. colinstone
    Joined: Feb 2004
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    colinstone Junior Member

    We've just finished fitting out a 72 dutch barge. Barge took 2500 hours in yard to a sailaway standard, plus further 8500 hours by 2 of us. By going DIY saved estimated £300000. Great fun to do, learnt alot, and having lived onboard for a month or 2 got everything right.
    Done a car and house, so boat was next!!

    _____________
    Colin Stone
    www.luxe-motor-kei.co.uk
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  10. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    Definition of "boat":
    A hole in the water that you throw money into.

    Suggestion: start small. Build something really basic first, like a puddle-duck racer, and take it out and learn sailing. Then decide if you still want the big one -- and still want to do it yourself.
     
  11. terhohalme
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    terhohalme BEng Boat Technology

    First you need a decent design, working drawings and compele list of materials then one or more books of boat building. Then, you probably can build 1 kg of boat in one hour, of you are a handy and fast learning one. So 6000 kg of boat (your 36') wil take 6000 manhour. It takes minimum 6 years of your free time, all of it. Materials and equipment will take minimum $25 per kg. And the space, electricity, water, warm. etc. for six years...
     
  12. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The actual work of constructing a hull is a back breaker. Lots of time . work and heavy lifting.(How does 8000lbs of ballast get there ?, you hump it!)

    Perhaps you might consider rescuing a sunk or ignored GRP boat (for resale) .

    The hull is only 15% of the cost of the boat , but its a big time saver to be able to float , and move the boat right from the start.

    The interior , engine selection, rigging choice and all those expen$ive electric goodies can all be owner selected , AFTER you use the boat and figure out just what you need the origional boat failed to deliver.

    It will get you on the water a few years earlier .With just as much FUN!

    FF
     
  13. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    It's a disease. If it's a recent infection there may be hope but you shouldn't hang around this forum too long.
     
  14. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Jeeezzz Terhohalme, with that encouragement and my free time it's going to take me to my 300th birthday :( Do you know how up to sh2t our currency is going to be by then :(
     

  15. colinstone
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    colinstone Junior Member

    >Alright, I suppose it boils down to, is there any real reason why people build their own boats?

    Arthur Ransome hit the nail on the head in his book "Racundra's First Cruise" - and it is all true - especially 2nd para and the last sentence:

    "Houses are but badly built boats so firmly aground that you cannot think of moving them. They are definitely inferior things, belonging to the vegetable not the animal world, rooted and stationary, incapable of gay transition. I admit, doubtfully, as exceptions, snail-shells and caravans. The desire to build a house is the tired wish of a man content thenceforward with a single anchorage. The desire to build a boat is the desire of youth, unwilling yet to accept the idea of a final resting place.

    It is for that reason, perhaps, that when it comes, the desire to build a boat is one that cannot be resisted. It begins as a little cloud on a serene horizon. It ends by covering the whole sky, so that you can think of nothing else. You must build to regain your freedom. And always you comfort yourself with the thought that yours will be the perfect boat, the boat that you may search the harbours of the world for and cannot find."
     
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