Test borg warner transmissions

Discussion in 'Propulsion' started by boat3630, Dec 31, 2020.

  1. boat3630
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Prospect ky

    boat3630 New Member

    What is best way to test a transmission while it is out of boat ?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,439
    Likes: 1,011, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The best way is to input power and connect the output shaft to a dyno. What kind of equipment do you have?
     
  3. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 906
    Likes: 160, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    Well, it’s not high tech, but lacking a dyno I have tested marine transmissions on the bench many times.
    A stout 1/2” drill motor that will spin 5-600 rpms under load is the power.
    It’s linked to the transmissions input shaft by a short, stout rubber hose clamped over the chuck.
    Make sure there’s oil in the trans, and spin it up. You can attach a pressure gauge, and operate the shift lever to determine basically if the item works.
     
  4. boat3630
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Prospect ky

    boat3630 New Member

    Great , what pressure should I have to make sure it is right? I have some pressure gauges. I can build something with a hose.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,439
    Likes: 1,011, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The pressure should be about 300 psi. I don't know that a drill will have enough power. Also, to test it there should be a load on the input shaft to check the clutches for slippage. You asked for the best way, a drill is not even close to mediocre.
     
  6. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 1,055
    Likes: 225, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 512
    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    Gonzo, I have a question for you. Remember how I've been changing over my v-drive? Well, after I took the drive out I decided to replace the hydraulic lines on the Velvet Drive. I never noticed any slipping or problems with the transmission but one thing struck me. I pulled the little screen out of the transmission that sits behind the lower right side hydraulic line. There was absolutely no debris in it. I never looked at this fitting in the years I owned this boat. Wouldn't this screen be a good indicator of overall transmission health?
     
  7. boat3630
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Prospect ky

    boat3630 New Member

    If you were me how would have it tested?
     
  8. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 906
    Likes: 160, Points: 43, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    So the guy needs to set up a dynamometer in his garage to see if a transmission works?
    Your old 9 volt battery drill will be useless here, but a good old 1/2” arm breaker will spin it up nicely.
    Give the oil a sniff test, if it smells burnt, suspect worn clutches.
    Also examine oil from the sump in bright sunlight, looking for metallic particles.
    If you have any doubts, rebuild it, old BW s are easy and cheap to rebuild.
    Suggest downloading a manual.
     
  9. boat3630
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Prospect ky

    boat3630 New Member

    I am rebuilding it now I was just wanting to have a way to test it. Should I just take it to a transmission shop? Will I be able to test it with a 200 lb gauge?
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2021

  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,439
    Likes: 1,011, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    He asked for the best method, which means using the proper equipment.
     
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.