Temporary coating

Discussion in 'Materials' started by jtheriot, Apr 2, 2019.

  1. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    I am looking for a product that is compatible with epoxy resin and awlgrip. Due to limited space I will have to have pieces of my build outside for possibly long periods of time (mabby a yr or 2). Im looking for a paint I can roll on to protect from uv and the elements. Once the cabin is complete and on the boat it will all get faired and finished in awgrip. Does anyone have a recommendation of a cost effective roll on paint that is compatible? 95% will be sanded of before the fairing and paint process.
     
  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    "Dump stock" water based exterior paint from local big box diy center.
     
  3. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    Since 100% of this temporary coating will not be able to be removed before fairing and paint I was worried about the bond. Wonder if a thin coat of awlfair spread across the whole surface would work as sunscreen.
     
  4. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    No. Awlfair is epoxy and will degrade just as quickly as your lamination.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    How about some cheap tarps ?
     
  6. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    Bluenarr's right. An epoxy primer will degrade in the sun very quickly. When I did my build I built an a-frame cover. I used commercial grade tarps (white to keep things cool in the summer) with tie down grommets every 18". Commercial grade 3/8" bungee cord and good quality stakes hold it down. Even so, I've had numerous issues with windstorms damaging the cover, especially during the past two winters. The frame is 30' long by 16' high and about 15' wide. Cost for the good commercial grade tarps is about $150 and the framing lumber for the supports and ridge beams would probably run at least another $100 - $150. Build it strong and it will last about three years up here in New York. Along the Guf coast I'd wager two years is more likely due to UV degradation.
     
  7. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

    Yea a tarps is probably the easiest bet. Wonder if a protective plastic film with a sticky side like they use during production to protect finished parts would work. Of course it would have to be able to block UV.
     

  8. jtheriot
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 13
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    Location: New Orleans

    jtheriot Junior Member

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