Team Philips Videos

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by HydroNick, Dec 19, 2015.

  1. waynemarlow
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    What was the unstayed mast system that had a full boom out front as well as back that simply feathered both jib and main at the same time as well as giving optimum sail angles regardless of the heading of the boat. I think a Farrier was converted and a number of boats for disabled sailors ?
     
  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

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  3. HydroNick
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    HydroNick Nick S

    Obviously, I need more things to do. Try this:

    http://www.petegoss.com/userfiles/team_philips_bk.pdf

    The last photo and the photos of the mast base are astounding. This link and a few others originated from a Wiki article on TP. And as Catsketcher pointed out, I was totally wrong about the dirt floor.
     
  4. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Team Philips

    Nick, that's great stuff--thanks!
     
  5. R.Finn
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    Location: Slidell, Louisiana

    R.Finn Junior Member

    How are there no other options for reefing? The only time I've seen boats bear away from upwind to reduce sail was on Open 50's and 60's, to furl headsails, and that was years ago, when torque ropes were not as good as they are now. Furling upwind tended to hoggle the synthetic headstays, so bearing off to unload them was a standard. For reefing a mainsail, why would it not be business as usual? That said, I have a technique for reefing downwind that drastically improves the winching down against spreader thing. It basically involves heading up to a broad reach with a jib oversheeted so it backwinds the luff of the mainsail and makes the sail a lot easier to lower in big breeze. To be clear, I've done this a lot, but on nothing larger than a Classe 40.
     
  6. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Sure you can come head to wind and stop ... but racers don't think much of stopping.
    Also on a light multihull, you can reverse at high speed too ... which can somewhat complicate things, especially if shorthanded.
     
  7. DGreenwood
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    DGreenwood Senior Member

    Interesting. That is a technique I learned and use on gaffers that I have applied elsewhere. Can save a lot of grunt for the single hander.
     
  8. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Francis Joyon mentioned using the same technique to reef on his 100' trimaran IDEC.
     
  9. he b gb
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Location: ELLIOTT HEADS

    he b gb Junior Member

    Reef Trip 2 Photo's 1024.jpg
    Hi Wayne, I launched my twin balestron (aerorig) rigged cruising cat 4 years ago and couldn't be happier with my choice of rig. Rob is correct when he talks about the weather cocking ability of the rigs during squalls, a great attribute for any cruising cat (mainsails cannot be totally dumped on a normally rigged cat). Also Pogo is correct about the lower centre of effort. This is also a great feature of the biplane rig, no more of that "leeward bow down, windward rudder in the air attitude" that is common on most powered up cats. Cheers , Gerald.
     

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  10. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    he b gb;
    So your Balestron booms are wishbones ?
     
  11. R.Finn
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    Location: Slidell, Louisiana

    R.Finn Junior Member

    Yeah, I came on that while sailing a mini which uses bolt rope + full battens. Downwind that means locked out. However, when racing you don't want to head too off course to reef so that's what I did and it worked really well. Again, upwind and racing, I wouldn't go head to wind to reef, but I definitely wouldn't give up windward ground by cracking off more than a handful of degrees which happens automatically when you dump the main anyway. The headsail upwind does an even better backwind job. I've only gone full head to wind to reef on a boat with in boom furling, which requires a lot of nuance to do well. I do sail a boat that can weathercock the rig, and that is for sure the easiest.
     
  12. he b gb
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    he b gb Junior Member

    Yeah they're alloy tubes connected to the masts by spokes and then cold bent to make wishbones into fittings either end. They have guy wires from each end fitting down to the bottom of the masts to take the mainsail leech load and the jib luff loads.
     

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  13. rob denney
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    rob denney Senior Member

    That is standard reefing procedure on most boats, but won't work on multihulls which are running ddw either because it is too windy to safely luff when sailing downwind (common) or because they have borne away from the "zone of death" on a reach (unusual for cruisers, common for racers).
    In both these cases, the main is eased all the way out and is bent around the shrouds and spreaders, exacerbated by there being no vang effect as it is beyond the traveller. The boat is sailing fast enough to need careful steering so it doesn't gybe. These are the scenarios I was referring to and they are the scariest part of sailing for most multihull sailors. It is rarely a problem for a lead mine.
    It is much less scary to dump the sheet, let the main stream downwind (no stays to stop it) and take in a leisurely reef on a near stationary platform.

    waynemarlow,
    Aero rigs were the first unstayed ballestron rigs. The company (Carbospars) that built them went bust after a couple of rig screw ups. Their rigs were over engineered/overweight compared to what we are building now. One of the directors is still in the business, worked on the masts for Maltese Falcon and the latest Russian ugly boat. Very smart, nice guy, as were the other people in Carbospars.
    Aero rigs were the original rig choice for TP. They went with the less complex single sail rigs and lived with the higher sheet loads. We call them Easyrigs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8chR6DAFjGA

    Doug,
    Richard's comments are well out of date, as I have repeatedly told him. He gets the advantages right, but is wrong about the weight, pitching and weight carrying. The 50'ter in the video weighs 3 and a bit tonnes/tons.
    His "immersion" (bury) of 1:7 and requirement for a cabin is wrong, we have successfully used less than half this (0.75m on a 12m mast) on a heavy 35' open bridgedeck cat.
    The sail area can be as large as you want, we use jibs up to 35% of the area and still maintain the balance (roachy mainsails) and have flown spinnakers and larger headsails using a brace to the front of the boom.
    His comments about motorsailing safely and sailing backwards are absurd, those about costs are incorrect.
    Easyrigs are about the same cost overall as a standard rig. ie including deck gear, extras, etc. and are probably the cheapest rig (apart from a single sail on an unstayed mast, which doesn't work on many cats) if amateur built.
    Ballestrons are very low effort rigs which outperformed conventional cruising boat rigs in various boat on boat tests done by boating magazines.
     
  14. waynemarlow
    Joined: Nov 2006
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    I have been wondering for a while about the combination of the Easy Rig and I think it is Kurt Hughs fixed 1/2 hard sail mast combo with a larger jib. It would make cruising easy and depowering at will easy but with the larger mast always in the air, it could be a pain in Marinas but I think that problem was solved some how with all the sail controls and mast rotation able to simply weather cock at all times whlst in harbour.

    If you are going to make an infused mast then why not a full on front section of a hard / soft sail hybrid.
     

  15. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    aerorig

    ================
    Thanks, Rob-appreciate you catching that. Happy New Year!
     
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