SYRA 18 with canting T-foil

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by revintage, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. revintage
    Joined: Nov 2016
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    revintage Senior Member

  2. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    That's a truly bizarre hull shape.
    Why not just build a catamaran so that non flying will be faster?
    "Unique advantages"? What are they.
    So is it sailing as a scaled prototype and that is just an impressive graphic picture of a full size boat?
     
    OzFred likes this.
  3. CT249
    Joined: May 2003
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    CT249 Senior Member

    There have been earlier designs with that "innovative" shape, including a 40 footer around Newcastle, Australia. They didn't work.

    What are the odds that this will become the 64000th incredibly fantastic foiler to vanish without trace?

    Does anyone remember the days when people designed an innovative boat and went out and won races with it BEFORE they started putting their effort into telling everyone how great it was?
     
  4. revintage
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    revintage Senior Member

    My guess is, this might be a pair of Swiss guys with both to much money and financial backing who wants to show off and realize their dreams.
    Anyway the canting foil concept is still intruiging. From the Vampire Project I have learned that they found 20 degrees leeward angle was optimal.
     
  5. AlexanderSahlin
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    AlexanderSahlin Junior Member

    Good that they have a canted T-foil and a vertical mast. That configuration was very efficient on the Vampire, yes. But on the Vampire the active T-foil was outside the leeward hull, which gave much more righting moment and therefore, certainly much more speed. Maybe they want to have only ONE T-foil? If so, a possibility on a catamaran is to move the pivoting point upwards, so the foil comes closer the leeward hull when canted. This boat seems to be kind of a catamaran, so making a wide hole in the middle for the canting foil will certainly work.
     
  6. revintage
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    revintage Senior Member

    Hej Alexander!
    Note the reference to Vampire was only about the T-foil angle. Certainly Vampire should be superior sailwise, although with its lifted windward killer foil. A ballpark calculation shows that the righting moment of the two doesn´t differ as much as I suspected, 740 vs 880 kgm.
     
  7. OzFred
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    OzFred Senior Member

    The canting foil is an interesting concept, but I can't see that the configuration is practical. The deck sweeper main means the foil can't be retracted, so it needs perhaps 2m of water for the foil to be lowered and the boat can start sailing. Foiling gybes and tacks likely require incredible skill.

    I think a catamaran would be a much simper, lighter and more practical configuration. The hybrid mono–multi seems to have the worst aspects of each rather than the best.

    There are scant details on the (awful) web site, which seems like a throwback to 2o years ago when Flash tried to replace HTML.
     
  8. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    Yes? What is the evidence that the Vampire setup works very efficiently? How does the Vampire normally go against other cats and other foilers? It's done well at times, but been beaten by old non-foilers like Hobie Tigers at other times.
     
  9. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Pretty elaborate "boat" shown in picture. Despite all the sophistication, the jib halyard is slack and the wishbone needs to be lowered on the mast just a wee tad in order to smooth the foot of the main. Yeah, I know, I am being a nit picker.
     
  10. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    This is the one that sent a press release to Scuttlebutt claiming to be the "first double-handed monohull foiling dinghy", which will come as a surprise to the NZ R Class and UK Cherub sailors who were under the impression that they had not only sailed two handed foiling dinghies, but even won championships in them.
     

  11. revintage
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    revintage Senior Member

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