swim up bar boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by headtofoot, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. headtofoot
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    headtofoot Junior Member

    pic

    i am trying to attach a very basic concept illustration
     

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  2. headtofoot
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    headtofoot Junior Member

    the bartender(s) will stand inside the center and serve drinks to people swimming up to the bar
     
  3. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    Your concept is problematic from a stability standpoint. Having your bartender stand eye to eye with patrons forces a very deep hull. You can calculate how much force this takes by multiplying the volume times the the density of seawater -a couple tons. That much force is required to hold the center down or it will float up tossing port patrons overhead onto starboard patrons. You could cut the problem in half by letting the bartender sit and raising the bottom. You could fix the stability limit completely by making two of the bars drawn attached catamaran style -displacement is still trouble.

    Are those outboards? As drawn you need all the weight inside the hull. If you expect this bar to move like a boat you better make those bar stools lift out of the water.
     
  4. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    Another thought -this thing is bobbing around turning drinkers into pukers. If you had a very strong anchor point on the bottom you could hitch to you could crank this think down like a buoy.
     
  5. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    This all depends if you are serious about doing this or just playing around.
    Stability and weight distribution are important in anything that floats.

    Having seats attached to the bar is not a good idea because you don't know where people are going to sit, and therefore tipping the bar one way or the other.

    Yes it is possible to design a floating bar.

    Before you start, is it feasible.
    Where I live it wouldn't even be considered, there would be so much red tape that no-one would bother. We just about need a permit to poo.

    Here is some things you need to consider before you even start to build your floating bar.

    Operational costs.
    Including: Refrigeration running costs, salary for bar staff, stocking the bar, insurance.

    Income: Are you going to sell enough drinks to realise the profit margin required to create a profit.

    The cost to set make the bar is capital investment which you will get back when or if you sell the bar.

    The critical part is the running costs. Do you know how much profit there is in a glass of drink? You can then work out how many drinks you need to sell per hour to achieve the bottom line.

    OK, say yes you have calculated you can make a profit.

    You then need to calculate what is being stocked in the bar, its size and weight, where it is being stored.

    Frankly the drawing that you provided would indicate to me that you do not have a proper drawing programme, which you will require to draw the size of the bar in scale. A drawing programme would be a small investment in relation to the overall project.

    You also need standard measurements, I use the "Engineers Black Book" that provides counter heights and space required for people to work in.

    Only after you have worked out the economical feasibility and the size required should you start to work out how to build it.

    Good luck

    Poida
     
  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Midget bartenders would be perfect.

    It looks easily do-able, it just depends on what you'll need to carry along, if you have to motor much distance, water conditions, how many people to be accommodated, etc.
     
  7. Nate57
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    Nate57 Junior Member

    You need to give some info on what is required of this thing Headtofoot. I was assuming it to be an add on to an existing beach bar anchored in a few feet of calm water nearby.
    Does it need to move?
    Can it be restocked from shore?
    Require power? How many seats? etc.
     
  8. headtofoot
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    headtofoot Junior Member

    Thanks for your responses thus far. I think that making two separate work areas seems to be a good idea and making it in a catamaran style. I am looking to have the bartop abou 4ft up from the floor of the cabin and the bar/pontoons to be around 2ft in hieght only leaving a couple feet of cabin to be submerged. I figured i could extend the cabin area two ft or so and place 55gallon drums to fill with water and act as ballasts. Maybe even line the boottom with concrete. Or make the cabin itself out of concree.
     
  9. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    headtofoot -- I see no reason why this craft could not be designed and built. Having said that, this being a new type of business venture I would as previously recommended engage the preliminary input of professionals in the following order, an accountant, a marine engineer, government regulators, and an insurance company agent. A negative report from anyone of these necessary cogs in the wheel would deem this venture a no go and save yourself a lot of wasted time and energy.
     
  10. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Ohhhhh come on...this isn't a Fortune 500 venture. It wouldn't cost much to do, so skip the accountant. Marine engineer....he's not needed. Bermuda + government + regulators= maybe a small "cough cough" fee? As for insurance, right after we kill all the lawyers, we kill all the extra insurance agents. It probably wouldn't cost much anyway and it's a cost passed on to customers, as are all costs of doing business.

    You probably would not want electricity that has the potential to kill everyone, so a battery bank would be in order. Maybe a solar panel worked into an awning/sun cover, then you could claim "green" which is a big draw now. You'd load up with ice before departing.

    There are logistics that aren't known, like hours of operation as in daytime night time, numbers of customers, etc. I'm thinking that it wouldn't be too feasible if the water is rough at all and shallow water would be a very big want, 3-4 feet would be swell.

    Beer takes up a lot of room compared to drinks and overall you have to eliminate waste being left in the water, cups, bottles, cans, napkins, tiny drink umbrellas, etc.

    You could have a number of these floating bars in different locations that were maybe self motivating enough to get back to a marina for the night and have one regular vessel that would make the rounds and keep the supplies of beer and booze and ice up and take away trash, etc.

    Or maybe just a number of floating bars, semi-permanently moored with no self motivation, just towed out at the beginning of the season and towed back at the end.
     
  11. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    What I consider an obvious flaw in this idea is, who the fruit swims around with their wallet in their pocket.

    Poida
     
    clmanges likes this.
  12. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    One would think possibly the first question the accountant would ask to establish an economic base for the credit side of his business feasibility study . :?: :)
     
  13. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Hmm, that would be a problem. And look, it didn't take hiring an accountant to find that.
     
  14. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    You're assuming that Poida has no accounting skills---not necessary so my good man, not necessary so :)
     

  15. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    But at least in Aus our munni is waterproof....................:cool:
     
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