Swap Sail Rig

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Flumixt, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. Flumixt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: California

    Flumixt Junior Member

    Would this work aytall?????

    I'm thinking of swapping my Y-Flyer sail rig onto a Johnson Class C Scow.

    The Y-Flyer [wood] is 18 long, 5.5 wide with design main and jib 176 sq ft.

    The C-Scow [glass] is 20 long, 8 wide with a Cat rig (main only) 225 sq ft.

    I often rig the Flyer with a bigger jib which gives me 195 sq ft.

    Naturally I'd step the Flyer mast further aft than the C mast.

    Seems to me I'd get about the same power with more sail flexability since I carry 3 size jibs and 2 size mains to handle all the pickles I get into. Plus the extra beam would give me a bit more stability for single handing.

    Waddayathink?

    Then I could burn my Y-Flyer which is rotting faster than I can pour epoxy and chopped glass into it. Assuming it would dry out enough to burn.
     
  2. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    Why not? Sounds like you've got nothing to lose and only fun sailing to gain. I'd be careful about making permanent changes to the hull that would make the hull illegal for class racing - resale value always depends more on being class compliant. If resale isn't an issue, then do whatever you like.

    It may be worthwhile to consult one of the naval architects here, to help determine the optimal place for the rig. It also may work out better to leave the mast step where it is and reduce the board size for the new "Y-Flyer" rig.

    Rig location is balanced between the center of lateral resistance and center of effort - it also is a balancing act between sail area and lateral plain of the board & rudder. Using the twin scow boards with the Y-Flyer rig may not work as you hope - and single handling may not be comfortable.

    Too much lateral resistance will cause the boat to heel a lot and reduce the effect of hiking. Remember the technique of pulling up the board a bit in heavy wind? What you are doing is effectively the opposite.

    Best of luck,

    --
    Bill


    Update: Noticed you said Johnson C-Scow - this may be different from the Melges I'm familiar with but the comments still apply.

    --
    Bill
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2009
  3. Flumixt
    Joined: Oct 2006
    Posts: 38
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    Location: California

    Flumixt Junior Member

    >>Using the twin scow boards with the Y-Flyer rig may not work as you hope - and single handling may not be comfortable.<<

    Hi - Could you expand on this?

    I also have a V-21 rig that could be used instead tho that mast doesn't rotate.
     
  4. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    I did already I thought:

    "Too much lateral resistance will cause the boat to heel a lot and reduce the effect of hiking. Remember the technique of pulling up the board a bit in heavy wind? What you are doing is effectively the opposite."


    Boats are designed with the lateral resistance in proportion to the sail area - change the proportions of either one and the balance and righting characteristics change as well.

    --
    Bill
     
  5. Flumixt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: California

    Flumixt Junior Member

    OK. Looks to me like the C board is about the same size as the Y-Flyer board so I don't see a big problem. As you say the board can come up a bit. I grew up on scows so heeling is just a day at the office. At this preliminary point I don't see a problem with the boards except finding a good mast position (there may not be one, of course). I can nearly match the C sail area by setting a bigger jib. Oh Boy! Can't wait to try it. :)
     

  6. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Port Gamble, Washington, USA

    tspeer Senior Member

    I sounds like you are trying to revive the D scow!

    I'm skeptical that the smaller rig will improve the performance of the C. If I were looking to improve the performance of the C, I'd look at a taller, higher aspect ratio rig. Perhaps raked so the center of effort was in the same place from the existing mast step.

    The mast step problem shouldn't be underestimated. The bottom of the C's cockpit is not reinforced to take the vertical compression of the mast You may need to install some kind of truss to stiffen it up. You may not be able to go any further back than the front of the cockpit. But a post there to take the compression ought to work.

    When the MC came out, I was once interested in putting a more forward mast step on my wooden Melges M-16 so I could sail it as an MC as well as an M-16. I asked Melges about it, and they (of course) said don't do it. Of course, the MC is one-design, and although the hull shapes are the same, the M-16 hull & twin rudders wouldn't have been legal.
     
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