suitable wood for hard chined sailing yatch

Discussion in 'Materials' started by metin_mehel, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. metin_mehel
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: turkiye

    metin_mehel mech.eng.

    Hi guys,
    I want to build a hard chined sailing yatch (7.5m loa) what are the types of wood suitable for stringer?
    Thank you very much?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There are many. What can you get locally? If the designer already specified the species, that is what you should use.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    To follow Gonzo's comments, if the species the designer has suggested isn't locally available, then select a different species with similar physical attributes, that is available locally.
     
  4. metin_mehel
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: turkiye

    metin_mehel mech.eng.

    I am the designer. I can localy find spruce(picea) {400$/m3 unmachined stocks}. After selecting suitable wood I can make a finite element strength analysis to hull. But some times woods have suprising properties that I don't know. Moreover could you advise me a book which tells the properties of woods about boat building.
    Thanks a lot.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Each area of the world has woods that are preferred for boat building. I'm not sure what's available in your country, but most have forestry services of some sort and this agencies produce directories of the commonly available woods, listing their physical properties.

    Try this link www.thewoodexplorer.com and see what's available in your area. FEA usually isn't necessary, with some familiarly of your local species offerings.
     
  6. metin_mehel
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: turkiye

    metin_mehel mech.eng.

    spruce(picea) I can find it. What do you think? Is this suitable for stringers and chine log?
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    It depends on the design and the quality of the timber. Honestly, if you have to ask those questions, you are not ready to design a boat.
     
  8. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Philippines

    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Here. From a very old LR rules on Wood & Composite. I have another book but have to find it.
     

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  9. HakimKlunker
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Thailand

    HakimKlunker Andreas der Juengere

    Somewhat agreed. With less direct words: Your design requires a structural calculation and so you need to know the material properties.
    If they are unknown, you first need to study the materials before you can take the next step.
    Unless - - - you declare your boat experimental or for racing purposes and then you can crack it which ever way you please and you are still CE conform ;)
    Productive suggestions to consider:
    Your wood needs to take the expected loads. This will result in appropriate dimensions;
    Your wood needs to be either durable or well protected.
    Your wood needs to be available, treated and stored correctly (Termites, Humidity, warp, etc)
    Your design needs to consider conservation in terms of coating but also geometry to i.e. avoid condense water build up
    There is perhaps also a decorative aspect
     
  10. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    There are beautiful wooden boats built in Istanbul. Ask the builders what local wood they use, then cross reference for suitabilty. I believe locust, cypress , oak and a very dense pine are commonly used in turkey
     

  11. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Is that cypress similar to american cypress?
     
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