Suitable gelcoat base?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by NorthLakeFisher, Mar 12, 2022.

  1. NorthLakeFisher
    Joined: Jan 2022
    Posts: 12
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    Location: Souris Pei Canada

    NorthLakeFisher Junior Member

    Getting ready to prep the interior of my boat for finishing, preferably I would like gelcoat but wasn't sure what kind of a base I needed. The base is marine ply and was going to seal it with epoxy, is it suitable for gelcoat to sit on just that or would I need matting as well? Was hoping to avoid the extra weight but I would like the extra protection gelcoat offers, just don't want to see it cracking right away. am also not entirely opposed to marine paint but wasn't sure if that protected as well..
     
  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Marine paint would be far easier and lighter than gel coat.
    Gelcoat's advantage is coming out of a mold "good to go".
    Top coating with gelcoat is a major PIA.
     
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  3. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Paint it.
     
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  4. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

  5. NorthLakeFisher
    Joined: Jan 2022
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: Souris Pei Canada

    NorthLakeFisher Junior Member

    Appreciate all the input didn't know gelcoat was so fussy, I've decided to go with paint!
     

  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    If you have saturated the ply, as in the west system, you can use paint with a reasonable expectation of satisfactory result. If you have used fir ply, it might check, sooner or later, even if you had used gel coat.

    It may be interesting to note that a good quality house paint will endure as well as some of the high dollar "marine" paints. A good house paint will last ten years and more when applied to your house. It will last plenty long on your boat. It is less expensive, much easier to apply and easier to repair a damaged place. If you use a satin finish, it will not create sun glare as a slick enamel paint would. I am talking about the interior of the boat here.

    If you want some non skid places in the boat, then an acrylic house paint is the way to go. Paint the surface and sprinkle some silica sand into the wet paint. Let it dry in place. Vacuum up the excess sand. Paint over the imbedded sand with some more acrylic paint. If you want a less bumpy surface, use pumice powder rather than sand. Pumice will still provide a practical non skid surface but won't hurt as bad if you fall (while battling a huge trophy sized fish) and scrape your elbow or other part of your anatomy. For extreme cases for non skid use Bird gravel. Do not fall into a bird gravel non skid finish.
     
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