Suggestions on a slightly larger but still small rowboat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by declan, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. declan
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    Location: USA

    declan Junior Member

    Hey everyone!

    Last time I was here, I built a crappy but very fun little rowboat, this one:

    http://i.imgur.com/3zBN4.jpg

    Now, I have a little time and moolah again, and I got the boat building hankerin' again!

    So last time, I could get me and a friend in the boat, being a little cramped. A couple times we even did a third, but it would usually look like a clown boat (like a clown car) and take on water really fast. But with two it would be pretty much good.

    This time, I'd like to build one that can hold 2 people VERY comfortably, and 3 being a little cramped, but still without the distinct risk of sinking.

    Last time I used the "One sheet skiff" model (http://www3.sympatico.ca/herbert.mcleod/skiff.htm) which was fun and easy, but now I guess I'm looking for something slightly bigger. However, I still want to just do it for fun and not make a huge deal out of it. You know, learn a little, mess around more.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?

    Right now I'm picturing ones kinda like these:
    http://www.bateau.com/prodimages/FS12_350.jpg
    http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=FL14
    http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=FL12&cat=11

    Thanks!!

    PS: It just occurred to me that before, I used a 4x8 piece of plywood for my boat...do they make sheets bigger than that, for the hull?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Delcan,

    I would say you have a whole lot of choices really. I guess size would be an important decision. then of course you have to consider if you want it to be car toppable or not. You obviously know what it takes to build,
    so you you don't have worries there. When I first looked into building a boat I was amazed at how many good plans were available at a reasonable cost.
    the links you have seem quite similar to the boat you built.
    (perhaps with a bigger budget).

    Then of course where you plan to use it and what for what purpose are some other considerations. Its tough to suggest a particular boat.
    I do have a link on my blog to the choices I made. So that could be a start,
    to consider. I think your situation is very similar to what mine was. so all I can really suggest is to google wooden boat plans and take it from there.
    Its certainly not an easy decision.

    I used all 4x8 marine plywood. I think its a good size to work with,
    and I believe many plans are designed with that (common) size in mind in and effort to keep waste cost minimal.

    hope this helps a little.

    DE
     
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  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    messabout Senior Member

    I vote for the 14 foot skiff. The 14 will be much more versatile than the 12. The kit prices are pretty steep for such a basic boat.

    Build it with Meranti or Okumee ply and it will be pleasingly light, adequately strong, and will not check like fir does. Looks like you can get it out of 2 sheets of 6mm and 2 sheets of 9mm ply.

    Your little one appears to be well done.
     
  4. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

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  5. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    messabout Senior Member

    Dirteater; what was the rationale for using not only one, but two daggerboards? Your boat is a good looking example or near example of a Banks dory. Not a particularly good type for single handed sailing except perhaps down wind and even then a little touchy. The type rows well and is capable of carrying a big load of cod fish or whatever. Wouldn't a small keel and perhaps a skeg have been more practical than the boards? I'm tying to learn something here.
     
  6. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Messabout :)
    Your dead on really, but I wanted a boat I could sail, all be it in subtle conditions. When sailing I will only use one dagger-board, like a lea board if yo will. The reason for the 2 dagger-board trunks is to create the nice long space down the middle. Thus, I can sleep/camp-out in it (on shore). I almost named her "CREW-STOW" :D I've found the benefits of having the (twin) dagger-boards down while rowing do work well in both stabilizing the boat as well as tracking. Kinda firms her up nicely and she still rows easily. It also made for 2 more dry storage compartments on either side of the rower.

    I have to agree it an unique set-up. :)
    My plan is to take her sailing this coming spring!
    I think that'll be a exhilarating day to say the least!
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

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  8. DCockey
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

  9. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

  10. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Lewis,
    I would say that looks just about perfect to what Declan is looking for.
    Great looking boat :) I've been thinking about the troller set up for mine and I like your set up. what size of trolling motor are you using there?
    thanks
     
  11. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    Hi Declan. One thing's for sure- any of them will seem huge after the one sheeter. What area do you plan on using the boat in? how big is the water? For coastal bays and marshes I like 15-16' because there's usually a bit of a run to get were you want to go. A 400 pound boat with a 20hp motor is plenty for two people, and can do some real work if it can carry 1000 pounds in a pinch. Bit big to just trundle around the side of your house though, unless you have a garden tractor. 13-14 foot is fine for areas where you are basically "there" once you've launched. These can just be pushed into the backyard on a light trailer and generally manhandled for maintenance or storage. First real decision is to spec the range of outboard power you are considering, because the weight of the motor on the transom and the speed which it could push the boat determine a lot of the features of the boat.
     
  12. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Actually...that isn't me. I just did up the plans and he did the rest. I don't know what size it is but I expect somewhere around 45-60 lbs.
     
  13. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Yes but they are prohibitively expensive. There are many ways of joining your plywood together... The best is a Scarf (where you bevel both sheets and glue the overlap), there is the traditional butt using another piece of wood to span the joint, there is a fiberglass butt which uses fiberglass to span the joint and various puzzle shape joints which require some CNC cutting to get right.
     
  14. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    pistnbroke I try

    I like the last boat the 14 ft ..but why so heavy ..why 1/2 in ply ?? 1/4 plenty with a fibreglass coating on the outer hull ......50 kg is heavy enough all up.
    I am designing at the moment a 14 ft for electric power ..4 sheets of 1/4 ..35 kg + 3 kg epoxy and 150 g cloth on the outer with poly resin....about 45 kg .. easy enough to pull about and launch if you cannot get the trailer right up to the waters edge ....
     

  15. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    The 1/2" is for the power version and is recommended to prevent oil canning which I have experienced with thinner bottoms on flat bottomed boats. You can go with 3/8" if you so desire but expect some bottom flex when it pounds in a chop. I would not go with 1/4" unless there is significant framing if you are going to use a gas powered motor and get the boat up on plane. You are liable to get slapped in the face with the floor.
     
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