Suggestions for Pirate Tour boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by pcogs, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. pcogs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Shrewsbury

    pcogs Junior Member

    I am interested in purchasing a boat to use to take kids on "pirate tours".
    So far the only boat that I have been able to find is this;
    http://www.pirateadventurescapecod.com/boatbuilding/index.htm

    I have contacted them but they don't seem to be able to garauntee a boat for next season and it seems a bit expensive considering there is not a lot of interior work.

    Does anyone have some suggestions on a hull that can be re-purposed or a builder that can do this? Better yet if someone knows of something used that can be purchased.

    Some of the main criteria:
    Need to carry 40+ passengers and 2-4 crew.
    Shallow draft important, I don't have an exact depth that I need to live by but this will be for inland river / bay use.
    Needs to be able to look like a pirate boat.
    Efficient, dependable power. Needs to be able to move up to 50 people but doesn't need to go fast, between 9-12 knots is plenty. I have seen the boat in the link I posted with twin 90hp outboards, that seemed to be plenty.
    There is a chance it could operate in the hudson river, the current here is fast so if it has enough power to handle that it would be an added plus but not necessarily a requirement.
     
  2. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 897
    Likes: 37, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 442
    Location: usa

    wardd Senior Member

    i have a better idea, get a fast boat and a lot of guns and go hijack a boat for the tour

    suggestion, wear skimasks
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    These types of conversion are rather common in tourist areas. You can work from a conversion or an all new design.

    A conversion will look like a fishing boat that has some styling clues towards a "pirate ship" while a new, custom build could look very much the part.

    The real questions are budget and time frame. Having a floating pirate ship come next spring, might be pushing the envelope a little. You'll need to draw up the plans, either custom or retro fitted to an existing design, gather materials, find a builder, build, certify and then enter service as a commercial vessel, which is a fair bit to ask in a 9 month period.

    In any case, you need an NA to lead you through the process or find a pirate ship currently in service (bankruptcy sale, etc.).
     
  4. RHP
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 834
    Likes: 84, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 1183
    Location: Singapore

    RHP Senior Member

  5. joz
    Joined: Jul 2002
    Posts: 166
    Likes: 0, Points: 16, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    joz Senior Member

    I have seen in some US magazines and on youtube small priate ships of about 20 feet or so which have been built and sailed you will need to find the designer and contact them.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    So Joz, how do you expect to carry his passenger requirement with one of the whatever you're trying to describe? RHP is correct in that starting with a sailing workboat would be a good base.
     
  7. pcogs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Shrewsbury

    pcogs Junior Member

    Did a bit of research and it looks like H&H Marine builds the hull that is used. I will put a call into them tomorrow. It appears as thought the 40' hull is the one I'm looking for.
    Now I need to find out how to make it "Piratey".
     
  8. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    RHP, Jones act. Schrewsbury dude, 40' and 50 people? My Marine Safety Detachment would not have this thing inspected in time. Plan on a regular T-boat painted black and with pirate theme decor for next year. Start construction on real thing as soon as you are convinced of plan viability.
     
  9. idpnd
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 23
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: UK

    idpnd Junior Member

    A turkish gulet might be the ticket. huge, affordable, wood or steel, sails as well. quite piratey classic look.
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    www.roverschooners.com/

    Merritt Walter has a large (15-20?) of his designs out and working for folks.

    They should meet ALL your specifications , and might be avilable used, with current COI ready to work.

    Where you will operate (dock & parking) will be major concern , as when you become sucessfull , the dock owner may becomr your "partner".

    These operations atre not cheap to run , figure about $75K for advertising , insurance is NOT cheap, and more than one operator to run boat so it can get the most use.

    Good hunting,

    FF
     
  11. joz
    Joined: Jul 2002
    Posts: 166
    Likes: 0, Points: 16, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    joz Senior Member

    PAR

    its up to Pcogs to get in contact with the designer for him to discuss the possibility for him to redesign the vessel to the size that he requires and its uses.
     
  12. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    idpnd, There is something called the Jones act that will not permit a foreign build.
     
  13. pcogs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Shrewsbury

    pcogs Junior Member

    Guys- as much as I want to find something used here are a couple of the problems I'm finding.
    Most boats won't meet the criteria, the old t-boats look interesting but I would imagine a maintenance nightmare. Also most seem to need a fair amount of water under the hull.
    Most of the older sailboats I have looked at definately need a lot of water under them and the power plant if they have one is ancient. Certainly that could be replaced and I have actually found one sailboat that meets most of the criteria for a good price but once again it needs a lot of water to operate.

    I have found a great place to put the boat and have worked out a contract with the marina owner that protects my business interests for 10 years. If I cant get a shallow water boat I could put it at a different spot farther up the hudson and sail out of NYC.

    I am willing to just have the guy that's done this before build one for me even if it is at a premium price. He's been through it plenty of times and I'm sure has fixed some mistakes along the way. The only problem is that I don't think I'll be next in line to get one for this coming season, plus the fact that it really does seem to be a premium price.

    With the right hull the rest of the build doesn't seem like it would be that hard. A covered area with benches and a helm station, the deck & the railings. Add a mast (not functional, just for show) and put some outboards on the back. I realize I'm over simplifying this but the point is that there is no cabin with a ton of finish work.
     
  14. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Don't forget that the Coast Guard will be there every step of the way, with paperwork accepted by a bureaucracy before anything is started. That hull looks perfect for what you're doin' by-the-way. I'm just trying to forestall the inevitable disappointment of trying to get a project of this magnitude done in one winter. The outboard power will help in this vein.
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Again, this is why you hire a NA. They'll work with the builder, the marinas, the certification authorities, etc. You shouldn't be attempting to do the leg work, mostly because you're going to miss critical elements and issues.

    A local NA will know the yards that can handle your needs, they'll be familiar with the builder's needs and certification requirements, etc.

    In the end, you're going to have to have a NA sign off on the modifications anyway, so get them on board early in the project so you don't end up spending more time and money on things you don't need.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.