Sueños Mojados

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Saqa, Jan 11, 2015.

  1. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    sounds like you have other more pressing problems than boats

    Good luck hope you're all back to normal soon
     
  2. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    The builders should be on to it asap. My cousin was occupying the flat in my absence and they had to evacuate in the middle of the cyclone when the roof blew away and ceiling caved in. Fortunately on the other side of the common wall has a concrete roof and took them in

    That damage is nothing compared to how many others have faired. There are seven confirmed dead in my township due to collapsed buildings, hit by flying debris and drowning. Comms are still down

    It will be fixed and life goes on. I am currently working major hours in Sydney to save up for my commercial fishing venture in Fiji

    Thanks for the well wishes
     
  3. groper
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    groper Senior Member

    no - I said I have no doubt that you can make it work... I also have no doubt that it could work better in composite :)
     
  4. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    There is no doubt whatsoever that composite will perform better. Will it resist wear and tear better? I think what I am aiming for is finally being understood in very painful process. Trashy **** boat that shrugs off abuse but can still wear a nice set of heels!
     
  5. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Marginally better than composites, but not as good as metals.

    Abrason resistance of materials.jpg

    Composites in green, PE (HDPE) in red and metals such as ally in blue.

    But as previously noted many many times, if you wish to select a material for an application based upon one single characteristic, whilst ignoring the others and the understanding why...that's your choice. Just get on with it and stop bleating...:eek:
     
  6. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Re the wheelie bin. I think its also a good comparison, for a boat with 4 foot loa and 2 foot beam. Still I have seen plenty that are cracked. I think those polycraft boats are good. They are used a lot by boat hire places. The very heavy weight makes them stable for non boaters and less easily damaged when docking or hitting rocks.
     
  7. groper
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    groper Senior Member

    A wheelie bin doesn't have a power to weight ratio to worry about... Very bad comparison...

    If you made a wheelie from resin infused fiber reinforced resin, And it was designed to be the same weight, it would be one hell of a strong wheelie bin.... Stronger than the hdpe one. Back to you...
     
  8. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    Is that same as glass and foam or glass and ply sandwich?
     
  9. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Sure it does. It has to accelerate, fully loaded up into the air under power of a 400hp dump truck, then it gets smashed down into truck. Not sure you got my tic comment about the length and beam of a wheelie bin sized boat :p
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The odd wheelie bin has succumbed to automotive engine blocks being dumped in them !
     
  11. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    I guess Groper is right then. They cant handle the power.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    As mentioned, many eventually split, without experiencing the rigours of dumped engines. But they are pretty cunningly shaped to avoid flat panels.
     
  13. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    For four years I sat on a taxi rank outside one of the busiest Maccas in Sydney and watched their dozen or so wheelies cop a nightly pounding without a single failure

    They get accelerated hard while fully loaded by a motive force clamped to one end and a lot harder then ordinary outboards can. Brought to an abrupt halt and jarred hard

    Seems like I might have somehow given the impression of a big cruiser. Something like a Hobie Cat Getaway (also HDPE) but longer and built for power instead of sail is what I intend. Hard deck spanning the ally crossbeams and ally mesh or tramp front and back

    There are a few strategies that I need to examine. The one I favour is heat forming the compound shape in my final drawing to make one half of the hull shell. I have done a similar project before when making a large HDPE lined chopping board that featured a shallow depression set in a wooden top. This wasnt difficult to do and feel I can do it over a male setup of multiple frames mold

    3m makes something called Scotch Weld which can do polyethylene to polypropylene. I think you guys can work out where I am getting at right?
     

  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A few years ago I installed a 4500 litre polyethylene water tank under the house. It just fitted between the stumps, with about 2 cm clearance both sides, tank empty. When it filled, that dropped to about 1 cm, halfway up the sides. Over time, that clearance disappeared, and it now touches the piers. The tank hasn't crept over the floor, it has seemingly slowly stretched. I've have never noticed were it not so close to start with.
     
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