Submerged Fiberglass - Can it be repaired?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by priel, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. priel
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    priel New Member

    Hi all,

    This is my first post to this forum. I have not yet become a boat owner, but the time is closing in fast. I've been looking for a renovation object, something that will keep me busy for a few years forward, and I came across this very badly kept Silverton 362 from 1995. It's basically been laid up for a couple of years in the sun, with no protection whatsoever. What's worse is that rain has seeped into the boat and filled up a rather large part of the bottom hull, just below the floor planks. This has been going on for quite awhile... the "caretaker" told me that he usually empties it out after a heavy rain.. but since the water was still there when I came to look at it, I doubt this ever got done. Good intentions that never got done I figure...

    My question to all you experts in the know... is a hull that has had this kind of damage worth resurrecting? As far as I know, this particular Silverton have a solid fiberglass/composite hull... not cored. Has water seeped into the fiberglass and caused structural damage? Perhaps the wood has been damaged inside too?

    I'm trying to get hold of a surveyor to go check it out, but wanted to hear any feedback from the forum first... perhaps someone been in the same situation and gone through a major hull repair as might be necessary here. I'm prepared to redo the gelcoat and repaint... but if there is major structural damage I'm in over my head.

    I understand that pictures can only say so much... but any ideas or suggestions would be great.

    Thank you in advance,

    Peter.

    Ps. The two crusader engines were taken out of the boat and kept in a storage area.
     

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, you can expect considerable damage to the wooden portions of the structure. These can be replaced. The value of a yacht of this type is geared around how and what she's equipped with. If the equipment is worth the asking price then the hull shell is basically a container to hold it all.

    If engine(s), transmissions(s), electronics, tankage, etc. are salvageable then it could be worth is. This assumes you are a reasonably handy person, that has some 'glassing, mechanical, electrical and plumbing experience under your belt. If you would struggle to change out a raw water impeller, then you might consider another prospect.

    A key question would be if the engine(s) have been submerged. If so, they'll need to be replaced or rebuilt, which isn't so bad if you can do it yourself, but costly if it's jobbed out.
     
  3. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
    Posts: 2,164
    Likes: 53, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 575
    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Open up engine and see if water got inside. Sometimes water can be upto starter motor and no water gets inside. If water got inside that is another story. Take out plugs, squirt wd40 everywhere see if you can turn them.

    Hull is easy, drill a bunch of holes, wherever it collected, let it dry out. There such a things like a moisture meter. I have heard of people using dehumdifiers, silicate and other moisture remover. This can take a couple of months under a good cover. Osmosis in reverse. You can always patch holes later. Any and all rotten wood has to go, if stingers are rotted then there are ways to fix them.
    If electrical wires got wet, they probably need to be replaced.

    All in all it depends on your time, on much it cost you and how much you want to spend.
     
  4. priel
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 2
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    Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    priel New Member

    Thank you both very much for your replies. The engines were taken out before the boat was laid up, I'm not sure why. As far as I understand it, one of them had a stuck piston... so it probably seized. Not surprised if the past owner ran it without oil or something.

    As much as I like the looks of this boat, I've decided to take a pass on it. It can be had for close to nothing, and manual labour is cheap in Malaysia... but I'm just not comfortable with how big a job a boat in this condition would require. Replacing the majority of the stringer, perhaps the transom due to rot... rewiring all the electrical systems etc.. and who knows what else might be busted, like tanks and instruments.

    I appreciate the feedback, it's what I needed to hear. Been known for doing impulsive purchases in the past!

    Cheers,

    Peter.
     
  5. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
    Posts: 2,164
    Likes: 53, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 575
    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    I good descision. I have done the above a few times and it always cost more than you think, alot more. But the boat has to be special before it is worth all that work. Otherwise buy something that actually runs and still needs more money than you think. There sould be plenty of really good deals out now.
     

  6. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
    Posts: 2,164
    Likes: 53, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 575
    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Because

    Because their wives did not give them any free time
     
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