Submarine driven by kites

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by schakel, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    When this previously came up that was a suggestion.

    Unfortunately waves at sea extend their influence down also.
    Subs typically are round and have little resistance to rolling.

    While in the USN I as on a SSBN in the Pacific in a heavy storm at 300' taking 60 degree rolls. That was unpleasant to say the least - you had no horizon refer to and the only thing that made it acceptable was that the roll period was long and regular.

    It's not "peaceful" close to the surface in a storm.

    This is a very silly suggestion. IMHO
     
  2. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Even down at 300 feet eh. Impressive. Thanks for the insight.
     
  3. Rastapop
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    Rastapop Naval Architect

    Waves are considered to have no significant effect at a depth below half their wavelength, so in the example above the wavelength would have been quite a bit longer than 600 feet.
     
  4. pogo
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    pogo ingenious dilletante

  5. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

  6. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Rastapoop,

    Have you ever been on a submarine?
    I wasn't there very long, but it only took one trip to actually experience what I stated as fact.

    I really don't care about your ussupported statement says.
     
  7. Rastapop
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    Rastapop Naval Architect

    Er, and I don't care that you don't care about my statement?

    I didn't dispute anything you said.
     
  8. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    if shallow enough they also have the sail (in the normal sense) perfectly positioned to help catch whatever rolling motion may be there.

    I always liked the bit from The Hunt From Red October where the helicopter navigator is cheerfully recounting the hurl fest on a previous flight in a storm.
     
  9. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Wave motions in water happen at more than just near the surface simply because they can be set off by more than just wind.
     
  10. schakel
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    schakel environmental project Msc

    That's it. It proves the idea works!
    Thanks a lot!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tEw_mlUh7g&feature=related
    Submarine drives by kite.JPG
    40 KGforce on the kite line.
    This is the kite they used.
    Submarine drives by kite 2.JPG
    Nothing is said about the velocity but you can hear the high pitch of the outboard motor of the RIB trying to catch up with the sub.
     
  11. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    From Wikipedia on ocean swells:

     
  12. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    credit lies with Pogo - his find.:)
     
  13. pogo
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    pogo ingenious dilletante


    No, no , no !!!!!!!
    Credits should, no, must go to the "inventors"; see vid.
    Chapeau, hats up !
    it ain't my babe !!!
    mostly , as everyone , i' m a surfer ....


    Credits go to http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Urheber.html






















    Technical

    I think it makes no sense at all.
    A dynamic sub-- a foiling sub-- is a very intersting gimmick.
    It obviously takes a lot of brain , a lot of experiments , ' til succes.
    But , it's a scale model only !
    No practical use at all.
    Very interesting, but at the end only a gimmick . A self sufficient toy.
    Think of the start of such a dynamic sub, think of the possible courses, the control .....
    State of the art: Benjamin Franklin profing that a kite ....lightning strikes ....

    A conventional sub , a deplacement sub with a a kite ?
    Hahaha !


    Nice idea .
    But why should we go underwater to cross oceans ?
    We have enough aero/hydro/static/dynanamic challenges on the sea's surface.
    A sub, being of dynamic or static type , is not only too advanced , the lack of kite control ( course) is the main drawback.

    Also a kite propelled static sub will never ever come close to records, ' cause of his torpedo shape it wiil be pulled only--downwinds--
    at about hullspeed+.
    Give a soaked tretetrunk a kite and u gonna see it . No speed, no course control.
    Think of of drowning paratroope pulled by his parachute
    In other words, such a craft needs foils , horizontal and lateral , or a combi . or diagonal, whatever. U gonna end at a dynamic sub ( see again the vid ) .
    So , in my opinion , it makes no sense to discuss about the minimum operating depth of a static kite driven where rolling does' nt happen.
    how deep must my slowliest uncontrolled pulled torpedo be ?


    Either u kite on the surface trying to avoid the drawbacks of a seastate by planing, foiling, perhaps deplacing , or a combination ,
    or u foil underwater ...see vid , or Starwars, no , Doug Adams.







    pogo
     
  14. Rastapop
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    Rastapop Naval Architect

    Yes.

    And tsunamis can have wavelengths of kilometres. I was equally aware of all this before I posted as I am now.

    Do you have a point to make?
     

  15. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    I don't think he was trying to dispute you. Probably pointing out that there really isn't a contradiction
     
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