stupid question about molds: How is this gonna popoff without being 'trapped'?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Squidly-Diddly, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Sure looks to me like the stringer where the main upper surface meets the mmain lower surface sticks out a good inch at about 30 degrees the wrong way from vertical (clearly visible at stern), and would surely prevent the mold, or the boat being built on the mold, from coming off in one piece.


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  2. wet feet
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    wet feet Senior Member

    Ever heard of a split mould?
     
  3. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Never mind, I get it.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Yes, it was a split mould for sure, which does make you wonder why they designed it that way, almost as if that was an afterthought.
     
  5. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  6. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Have you forgotten the early haines. Huntsman and mustang hulls mr e. They were all split mold .
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Yeah, I realise that, I don't know why they opted for that chine widening addition that causes it to need a split mould, wasn't such a brilliant idea as the fact it was later dumped suggests. But I have seen a Formula 233 with similar (though larger) alterations, the supposed reason being to firm it up at rest. I doubt that made much difference. :rolleyes:
     
  8. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I tbink it was an r c hunt idea. I had 2 mustangs with it and both were very dry boats.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think you are right, it was Hunt's idea, but I can't see how it achieved anything that couldn't have been equally well accomplished without resort to a split mould. It might have given the visual impression of a deeper vee, than just having a flat at the chine by extending the topsides further down. And deep-vee was the buzz-word selling point back then.
     
  10. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I just thought they were good spray rails. Every builder would agree with you because no one has used split molds for the last 40 years that i know of.
     
  11. wet feet
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    wet feet Senior Member

    Really?I know of several and if you look around you will see evidence in all sorts of places.How else would you mould in portlight recesses or fender flats or liferaft wells-well you get the idea.
     
  12. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Sorry. I was referring to the old style v hulls in australia. I don't know what goes on in other countries. I stand corrected.
     

  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There would be few boats in that smaller size range made with split moulds. I am still a little puzzled why those Hunt boats had that particular feature.
     
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