Study model for 1940's steel Fish Tug, construction details needed

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Tops, Aug 23, 2021.

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  1. Tops
    Joined: Aug 2021
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    Tops Junior Member

    Ahoy all,
    I am working on a study model for a 1940's steel fish Tug, 40' LOA x 12' W 3-4' draft.
    I have plans from a museum but the plans assume one really knows how to loft, frame, and skin a steel boat. So many details are left out, like the keel and framing members and skinning choices (1/8" above the sheer and 1/4" below?)
    I am hoping to modify my model to be more 'anatomically correct'...it does not need to 100% or anything.
    Any information, CAD files, book suggestions, interweb links- all are appreciated.
    Thanks and fair winds!
    -Tops


    upload_2021-8-23_18-48-19.png upload_2021-8-23_18-49-9.png
     
  2. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    I'm lost here ... why do fish need tugboats?
     
  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    There were many books published during WWII to teach basic concepts and skills to the massive influx of tradesman to US shipyards. Many of them are still used today, because the concepts haven't changed, so look for the following books.
    Introduction to Steel Shipbuilding, Baker, McGraw-Hill Introduction to steel shipbuilding. (1953 edition) | Open Library https://openlibrary.org/works/OL7468191W/Introduction_to_steel_shipbuilding
    Ship Repair and Alteration, Haliday & Swanson, Cornell Maritime Press Ship repair and alteration (1942 edition) | Open Library https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6437342M/Ship_repair_and_alteration
    Naval Architecture as Art and Science, Liljegren, Cornell Maritime Press Naval architecture as art and science (1943 edition) | Open Library https://openlibrary.org/works/OL7672108W/Naval_architecture_as_art_and_science
     
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  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    It's a Great Lakes thing... just like the design. Doesn't really make sense until you see how and when the operate.
     
  5. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Fish tugs are not tugboats. A very long time ago in the 19th century some boats on the Great Lakes were used for both fishing and towing. Hence the name "fish tug" even though the direct ancestors of boats such as the one in the photo may never have been used for towing.
     
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  6. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    Great Lakes, okay. That explains their uncanny resemblance to submarines. I live about fifteen miles east of Cleveland, so I've seen a little of it. Been out on it in a kayak a few times when it wasn't being particularly pernicious. That was kinda fun for a while, like a little roller-coaster ride, but I never stayed long because half the time there was nothing to look at but the faces of waves.
     
  7. Tops
    Joined: Aug 2021
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    Tops Junior Member

    Thanks Everyone. I have the Baker book on order. I also have this image of a burly fish at the helm of a boat stuck in my head...:)...I have seen more pictures of them breaking ice than I have of them towing other vessels. Currently my half model is 'solid', next step will be to hollow it out and locate the soles. There is a main one about at the waterline and another up 2-3 steps to the helm.

    Captain Fish Stock Illustrations – 2,286 Captain Fish Stock Illustrations, Vectors & Clipart - Dreamstime https://www.dreamstime.com/illustration/captain-fish.html
     

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  8. Tops
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    Tops Junior Member

    Scooped out the melon, 13,xxx pounds per 'half' and 6' of headroom...59xx kg (1/2) and 1.83m for those doing SI.
    mass_half_ic.jpg
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Those tugs where mostly built using common/best practices. Each shipwright had his own methods and details too. There are plenty of them still around if you want to get dimensions and structural details.
     
  10. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    For really specific information on these boats see Fishing Boats Of The World; Vol.2. Published in 1960 by FAO at the United Nations, it contains a chapter on the Great Lakes Gillnetters by Thomas Colvin, which includes lines drawings, specifications, and scantlings for these boats.
     
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  11. Tops
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    Tops Junior Member

  12. Tops
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    Tops Junior Member

    How were these assembled? Were these lofted to stations, skinned, and then framed...or fully framed before being skinned? Built upright or flipped?
    Were the frames flat stock? I have seen videos of modern builds where frames are plasma cut in shaped plates and smaller lengths and re-assembled to a plan before being stood on the keel and before skinning.

    I am hoping to get the book soon and also go see a few more close-up in person, the nearest ones are 4 hours driving one way.

    I find myself watching this video again after getting an email reply from one of the guys in the documentary:






    loft1csole v3.jpg
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You are asking the wrong questions. Each shipwright had his own methods and preferences. There are plenty of these boats in the Great Lakes. Go and look at the actual item.
     
  14. Tops
    Joined: Aug 2021
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    Tops Junior Member

    The Baker book came in yesterday. It seems better suited for larger vessels, the pictures and glossary look to be quite useful.
    The Colvin article has good info on framing members and spacings for a surveyed boat in the 40' range and those are what I worked into my CAD model.
    Gonzo's advice to see actual boats will really need to happen for me to see the actual details for the joints used, etc...hoping I can see a couple and compare/contrast how things were done.
    Thanks again for everyone's input!
    study_materials1.jpg
     

  15. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

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