Structural glass / Hull side windows

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by ToMeK, Mar 12, 2021.

  1. ToMeK
    Joined: Nov 2006
    Posts: 22
    Likes: 1, Points: 3, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Zagreb, Croatia, Europe

    ToMeK Young naval architect

    Hello everyone!

    Please help me with an advice and guidance where to look for the rules for scantling of large hull side windows. Project is small planing boat 45ft GRP.

    According to ISO 12216 in Area I (on the hull side below hs) smaller dimension of apliance must not be larger then 300m (b<300mm).

    My conclusion is that this glass must be taken as structural, but I am having difficulty finding adequate rules glass calculation should be made according to. Does anyone have any experience or an advice? If possible it would be good to keep boat under ISO class.

    Similar example is GALEON 700 SKYDECK 2021 with obviously large glass areas on sides close to WL.

    Many thanks,

    Best,

    Tom Galeon 700 skydeck 2021 - p5.jpg Galeon 700 skydeck 2021 - p4.jpg
     
    bajansailor likes this.
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    It is a combination of structural and stability.
    But ostensibly it is more about stability. Since if the window breaks...what occurs?..the hull is flooded!

    Use smaller windows, or try finding a set of rules that allows you to do what you want.
    Good luck ...
     
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  3. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    The idea is precisely that the glass is not structural. To do this, the area around the opening is greatly reinforced, doubling its thickness and placing additional frames and longitudinals, and placing a resistant frame, all of which tries to prevent stress from being transmitted to the glass. This is, therefore, only subjected to forces perpendicular to it and, as such, is calculated.
    And don't trust the luck. The only thing you can do is calculate correctly.
     
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  4. ToMeK
    Joined: Nov 2006
    Posts: 22
    Likes: 1, Points: 3, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Zagreb, Croatia, Europe

    ToMeK Young naval architect

    Thank you very much for your comment TANSL.
    I agree completely. Structure around glass must be very stiff and strong to prevent any possible passing of stress or deformation to glass itself. But, there must be some consideration around glass as well, since in this way it still has purpose of taking local loads, whether hydrostatic in case of heel, or fender pressure during side mooring, even possible impact. This is my concern and this is why I assumed there must be some additional rule demands on glass if the unsupported area is bigger.
     

  5. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 6,627
    Likes: 446, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    It is advisable to use polycarbolnate sheets, or similar, glued in such a way that, if one of the sheets splinters due to an impact, the pieces do not come off.
    The designer must apply the appropriate design pressure in each case, the maximum possible hydrostatic pressure depending on the situation of the glass, impact of a wave when the ship is sailing at maximum speed, impact of a floating object, ...
     
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