stripping paint from "Starved" fiberglass

Discussion in 'Materials' started by minno, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. minno
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    minno Junior Member

    Hi All

    repainting a small wooden stitch and glue dingy and the builder didn't use enough epoxy on the fiberglass tape, fortunately the paint isn't sticking very well.

    just wondering what the best way to get the paint out of the weave would be.


    thanks

    minno
     
  2. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Depending on the type of paint, a solvent or stripper may work.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Certainly depends on the type of paint, but as ondarvr says, a strong solvent like acetone might soften it and you can then blow it out of the weave with a light duty water blaster, or a fibre brush and a hose. Naturally leave for an extended period to dry out. If it was a 2-pack, that won't work.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A flap wheel will work best, with a moderate grit, say 60.
     
  5. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I answered the question you asked, PAR answered with what you should do. If the glass was resin starved it's of no value in the laminate, so removing it would be the correct action.
     
  6. minno
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    minno Junior Member

    it's just latex exterior house paint, sorry, I should have realized that would be an important bit of information, considering I've spent about 5 hours reading about paint the last couple of days :)

    mostly it comes off pretty easy but there's a few places it wants to stick.

    Thanx all, I appreciate the help.

    minno
     
  7. minno
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    minno Junior Member

    hmm, maybe starved was a bad choice of words, the glass was put down ok, I'm pretty sure it sticking to the wood really well.

    but the weave was never filled in so it looks like burlap.

    minno
     
  8. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    The weave issue is common, solvent and a stiff brush can reach the low spots and not harm the glass.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Methylated Spirits ("denatured alcohol") softens acrylic house paint.
     
  10. minno
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    minno Junior Member

    Thanx Guys, much appreciated

    minno
     
  11. minno
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    minno Junior Member

    Wow, is finding Denatured Alcohol ever a PITA in Canada, you basically have to read labels on lacquer thinner, finally found it at Home Hardware as BIO-fuel for an alcohol burning fireplace at $27 a gallon.

    minno
     

  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It ("metho") was a bio-fuel of sorts for park vagrants who could not afford a bottle of plonk, but at $27 a gallon, a flagon of sherry would be cheaper ! Nowadays it is sold with a colourant and an additive that makes it taste so bad, even the most desperate cannot quaff it. No more "white lady" ! The more inventive drinker would add effervescent fruit salts, to produce "bush champagne". All rather tragic.
     
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