strip planking v ply

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by wardd, Oct 17, 2010.

  1. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    a couple questions

    can strip planking be done cheaper and of the same quality as ply?

    can a design for ply be strip planked without major changes other than subbing strip for ply?

    will it require more frames?
     
  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Yes and no to all above..
    I'm afraid you got to be more specific if you wan't more accurate answers..
     
  3. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    with comparable boats can strip be of just as high a quality and cheaper as marine ply isn't used?

    how would the structure differ between ply and strip, other than the hull plating?

    this would be at or under 40' x 8.5'

    it's a displacement hull and speeds
     
  4. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    At that size defineatly strip planked IMHO
     
  5. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    you're saying you prefer strip plank at that size?
     
  6. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    does strip planking require closer framing?
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Yes, because you lose the benefit of the bracing provided by internal cross grain transversely extending across the hull.
     
  8. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    see, you can say things i can agree with

    would being epoxied make up for some of that?
     
  9. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    And not at all if you use the internal stucture to carry the transversal loads.
     
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Yes. Epoxy would add strength. To what extent? That is a matter of skill.
     
  11. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    I'm thinking bead and cove over frame waterproof glue with glass epoxy covering

    what kind of glue and other thoughts?
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Of course, you are right. But lacking that it would be weaker.
     
  13. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    That's better with smaller boats, boats treated with conventional impregs and glues, not worth a though if you were to use epoxy with glass..

    It's a very broad subject, and there's no single right answer. You need some reading like Meade Gougeon: The Gougeon brothers of boat construction..
     
  14. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member


    can you elaborate?
     

  15. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    It's a more complicated matter. Think of every bulkhead, cabinetry and shelves as a part of internal framing. Everything is arrangenge so that the "panel size" around the boat is in right proportions and sufficient to support the hull skin. In this so called "monocoque" structure it's all glued and bonded together, covered with directional fibers and epoxied together. No screws or nails needed. Anyway it's a good structure and no more vulnerable compared to any framed boat which can also be just as good as the engineering behind it..
     
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