Stringer questions

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Roboj, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. jimslade
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Location: north Markham

    jimslade Senior Member

    Here's a pic from the rear. I am modifying the rear with a molded in swim platform made out of nidacore. I'll take some new pics when the back is finished. I love that nidacore stuff. Its really strong.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Roboj
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    Location: Vancouver

    Roboj Junior Member

    Hello,

    Jim, earlier you said that you have bedded stringers in 5200. Has anyone used 5200 or another polyurethane adhesive like PL Premium to laminate the plywood stringer? It would be easier than using resin.

    Thanx Rob.
     
  3. scott steffe
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: port charlotte fl

    scott steffe Junior Member

    no no no
    pressure treated wood will gas once it is glassed and rot faster than milk
    roboj
    you need to call me
    i hope im not to late
    i just joined this site today
    www.allfiberglassrepairs.com
     
  4. Roboj
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: Vancouver

    Roboj Junior Member

    Hello Scott,

    Thanx for your input. I have not yet installed the stringers, waiting for the weather to warm up and for the plywood that I will be using to dry out. My wife would kill me if I started doing fibreglass work in the garage. It would stink up the whole house.

    I have never heard of that. Some new boat builders are even using pressure treated plywood. Where did you find this information, or is it from experience. The only thing I heard is you must let it dry out.

    Thanx again.
     
  5. scott steffe
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    scott steffe Junior Member

    i have seen it time and time again over the years
    it becomes like a slim on the suface which breaks down the glass
    then more time and it breaks
     
  6. jimslade
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    jimslade Senior Member

    If the pressure treated ply is well dried out. There is NO gassing effect, Your info is wrong. The ply that you saw was not dried out properly. The slime you talk about is WET ply, and the chemicals are coming to the surface. Alot of builders are now using pt ply. Poor build quality is the problem.
     
  7. scott steffe
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    Location: port charlotte fl

    scott steffe Junior Member

    it dosent matter no one should use it and any builder that is is selling junk
    35 years
    there is no way that any fiberglass will stick to creASOKE pressure treated wood which lets it get wet etc
    try it out glass some up then see in a week if you cant pull it right off
     
  8. jimslade
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    jimslade Senior Member

    Sorry scott, there is a web site that did testing on pt ply and it sticks as good as regular ply. I didn't believe it either so I did some testing of my own, and their right. The pt should be well dried out. Also any pt ply sold in Canada does not have creosote in it. Its band up here. When I tried to pull the glass off the ply, the wood failed first. I have used pt ply with great success. Now I use Nidacore. Never ever rot and super strong.
     
  9. scott steffe
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    Location: port charlotte fl

    scott steffe Junior Member

    well no matter what any web site or manufature has to say about pt
    it wont work trust me
    you are trying to convence your self it was alright to use
    # 1 wood rotts
    # 2 it is saturated with what ever dont matter saturated under pressure
    to slow down the rotting (follow)
    # 3 pt is not a good choice trust me
    but go ahead and use it if you like it so well
    but keep your life jacket on any little ones that get on your boat with you
    sheezze man 35 years i know what im saying
    there is no one ever done a study of any kind on pt for more saturation of a saturated product
    some one is lying period
     
  10. jimslade
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    jimslade Senior Member

    I don't want to disrespect you in any way. My business is restoring automobiles (30 years). My hobby is boatbuilding. The pt you are talking about is OLD technology preservation chemicals. I don't use it anymore because there are much better products out there, ie Nidacore. But you should not discourage the use of a new pressure treated ply because of your experiance with the old pt ply. I only deal with facts and my experiance with any new products.. The pt ply that was around 30 years ago has NO relevance to the pt ply in use today. Case in point. People think that if they use cedar today it will not rot, wrong, unless the cedar is at least 20 year old growth, it has not produced the proper oils to prevent rot. Well dried out pressure treated ply is an alternative to marine ply.(much cheaper) The main problem is to keep water out of the wood. If the pt ply gets wet, it will hold the rotting effect at bay. If we had listened to the naysayers, we would all be driving wood boats and cars that smoke like chimneys. (carbs).
     
  11. scott steffe
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    scott steffe Junior Member

    well im from mo so show me some facts
    i still dont think pt will hold any resin.
    and will flex until the glass on the suface lets go thus letting water in to the core
    lol
    im not debating here your facts have not proven a thing to anyone
    think about it and look up the word saturated
     
  12. jimslade
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    jimslade Senior Member

    I will find the article for you. I read it about a year ago.
     
  13. Roboj
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    Roboj Junior Member

    Hello Scott and Jim,

    Attached is a link of a manufacturer that uses PT plywood in their boats. Scott, while I value your input, I do not think what you have witnessed with PT plywood was representative of today's PT plywood. I certainly have done more research as a result of your experiences. Grady White also uses some type of rot resistant plywood in their boat. While doing this research, I have also found that resin bonds to PT plywood the same as it bonds to untreated, just make sure the PT ply is dry.

    Also Jim, living here on the Wet Coast, it is quite well known that second growth cedar is not as rot resistant as old growth.

    Thanx again for all your info.

    Have a great day

    Rob

    http://crownlineboats.com/aboutcrownline/tour/tour5.php
     
  14. scott steffe
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    scott steffe Junior Member

    thats a shame
    no wonder i have about 3 or so gradys a year in for transum.s
    i havent seen one of these crown lines yet but i will
    and that bond has been the point all along the olny reason to use wood is to save money but i dont think you save any money if its got to be re built every so many years
     

  15. Roboj
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Roboj Junior Member

    Another stringer question

    I am getting ready to cut out the old stringers, did some more cutting this weekend. I noticed that where the fuel tank sat, in the belly between the stringers, it looks like the stringer had a two long foot notch, about 3/4 inch deep, possibly for securing the fuel tank. Hard to tell because everything is so rotten. Is there another way which I can hold down the fuel tank, or which is the best way to install it? I do not really like the idea of notching the stringer.

    Thanx,

    Rob.
     
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