Strike 18/20 or Seaclipper 20 trimaran first build?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by mystrwizard, Sep 22, 2016.

  1. mystrwizard
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: SoCal

    mystrwizard Junior Member

    I am looking to build first boat and looking for easy build tri to use in Southern California off Marina Del Rey close to shore in ocean. Ive been looking at these three builds and wondering which might be more what I need. I like the idea of the wind screen on the Strike 18 and the fact that it uses hulls from others cats to make the build easy but how do they all perform? these would be stored on a trailer.

    Also might there be other options out there for easy builds. Mostly me and my son sailing, possibly 3 people but most of the time one or two people.

    Thanks!

    Reese
     
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I cannot comment about the Seaclipper 20 as I have never seen one

    for that matter, I haven't seen a Strike 20 either, just videos like this one

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWK7cOOtP_U

    I quote from an email after the owners 4th sail "we achieved 9 /10 kt to windward, 16 kt broad reaching under gennaker (14.8knots over 500 m and 14.3 over a nautical mile)". So not "touched 14 knots", but "averaged" it for a mile, a BIG difference as we all know

    That is a plywood hardchine main hull with Nacra 5.8 beach cat outriggers.

    I know the Strike 18 much better of course, having built and owned the prototype (BTW the plans show a lower windshield and higher wing)

    Lots of videos on my youtube channel, including this one easily overtaking a Windrider 17, so a good bench mark for comparison
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4iFXdFuihw&list=PLT7PbPvOm8lzv_qjPJuA80kU1ugLfABgi&index=21

    and this one sailing against a mylar sailed F24. 6ft longer, I suspect it's mainsail cost more than our whole boat! (our sails came from ebay, the jib was measured in 1972!)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycsGLNuA6FQ&list=PLT7PbPvOm8lzv_qjPJuA80kU1ugLfABgi&index=25

    There is no point in having a fast boat if it isn't easy to sail or won't do what you want when you want. So this video might help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOYhtdFwTpU&list=PLT7PbPvOm8lzv_qjPJuA80kU1ugLfABgi&index=23

    and try doing this on a small monohull (read the notes accompanying the video to see what I am doing)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pECFWJvXAow&list=PLT7PbPvOm8lzv_qjPJuA80kU1ugLfABgi&index=18

    Having said that, the Strike 18 and 20 are designed for different markets. The Strike 18 is a day sailer/cruiser, see here for example: http://sailingcatamarans.com/index....les/449-strike-18-cruising-in-a-canadian-lake

    whereas the Strike 20 is really intended for those who want to race. It would, for example, be a great choice for someone who wants to win the new "we'll buy your boat for USD10,000" prize in next years Race to Alaska

    Remember that all boats are fast when sailed alone, you need to sail against others to get a true feeling of performance, as in the videos I show here. And, failing a test sail, videos give you the best idea of what a boat is really like

    We kept our Strike on the water a couple of years, but also had our Strike at home on a trailer for two seasons, so we got the assembly time down to something like 15 minutes from trailer to sailing.

    You may have seen one of my 22ft Wizard catamarans in MDR

    I hope that helps

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  3. mystrwizard
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    mystrwizard Junior Member

    Actually I had already ordered the Study Plans for the Wizard and had also thought of that boat as a build, but feel that might be a bit much for what I need although did enjoy reading what it is capable of doing.

    Reese
     
  4. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

  5. mystrwizard
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    mystrwizard Junior Member

    Strike 18 plans, main hull only vs. with Quattro outriggers

    Not sure of the difference between the plans? are the plans complete enough with the main hull only to build the whole boat? info including the ams's, etc?

    Thanks!

    Reese
     
  6. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    yes, and if you have problems I can always help explain things and also offer advice on suitable donor boats

    Richard Woods
     
  7. Tom.151
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: New England, USA

    Tom.151 Senior Member


    Kind of sounds like you do have a preference - the Strike 18. It certainly will do what you ask, probably a lot more.

    Richard Woods is no slouch when it comes to drawing speed into a hull shape. If you have any doubts - watch his Strike 15 prototype video. That boat does things that few if any could achieve. Just saying. And if he says he'll explain things... that's a dead cert.

    Buy the Strike 18 plans. get together a list of ALL (15, 16, 18, 20) of the Strike build blogs and go through the plans and look at each of those steps in the build blogs - in the correct order (if you've got a helper, then include them in this process - it'll reduce explaining a thousand times and reduce their errors).

    The real issue is not will it be a good boat -- if it's built to plan it will be a great boat. You job is to build to plans.
    An example of this issue is the chine joint - among the build blogs you'll see chines that look more like a slalom course than the chine of a boat hull which is (usually a very smooth, continuous curve.
    How does this happen? Well before you put the ply on the frames it's near impossible to visually "see" the "chine to be" -- so errors in your frames are near impossible to find. But using battens to check is not always as sure fire as it seems. Wide spacing of the frames and a limp/bendy batten may leave up the creek so to speak.
    My guess is that Richard will have boat-specific suggestions.

    A related part of the answer is that some builders stand too close to their work when they're building - so the unfairness is much harder to see. Think about that and if you can set up so you can roll the skeleton and later the temporarily attached cut-to-shape ply panels out of the shed so you can get a more distant view, you'll be glad you spent the money for a few casters. :cool:
    An important part is to take all the steps and take them in the correct order - especially in sheet ply construction.
    If builders with the same plans can get such differing results - then you can get it right... so be sure to "ask Richard".

    I'll try to post an example of what you need to be on the lookout for

    In any event, built to plans, it is hard to imagine you not loving a Strike 18 for the usage you describe.

    Do remember to feed the monkies... keep a blog/log or post pics to this forum.

    Sorry to be so long winded, trimarans a really addictive, hope this helps,
    Tom.151

    Below, there's 4 major whoops in this example of an improperly built Strike 18 chine... look carefully, all the way to the transom. Don't repeat this building error.

    Strike18_ChineShaping_BehindTheStem..jpg

    ((EDIT))
    PS - if the only available production beach cat hulls are of the older/heavier variety, then compare those weights to the weight of Richards "home build" amas. If there's substantial weight reduction, build'em. You'll never be sorry when you experience the performance of a truly light weight trimaran.

    You pay for materials and spend the time only once -- but you enjoy the results every day you sail.
     
  8. 2far2drive
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Houston, TX

    2far2drive Senior Member

    Im the builder of the strike 18 shown as "what not to do". I personally found the spacing between the frames and the 1/4" ply to be just a tad worrisome, hence the natural sag you see in the picture. I ended up gluing in a small 3/4 x 3/4 stringer to try and remove some of the sag.

    I DID however mess the bow up just slightly. The had to do an emergency frame adjustment and I still didnt get the height quit right on BHD#1, but its ok. Being as I have let the boat sit totally unused and never even sailed for almost 2 years now, I couldnt tell you how it sails. I honestly lost all interest in sailing and trimarans until recently Ive felt the urge again to get it in the water. My obsessions run so deep sometimes that I eventually burn out.

    I tired quickly of the paradigm of boat design, (cheap, fast, comfortable... pick 2 but not 3) as I wanted all 3. I also got tired of Doug Lord's endless ranting and the fact that most people on here have never even owned a boat, much less sailed one. But hey... dreaming is dreaming I guess.

    Here is an example of a chine i did RIGHT on a much larger boat I built, a Bucc 28. There is some inconsistency in the actual chine due to my amateur use of a belt sander on the chine to radius it to "get the damn thing done".

    [​IMG]

    Also, here is the link to the entire build, you know.. so you can see the whole reference as opposed to one picture. :)

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/astraltx/albums/72157633360800603
     

  9. Tom.151
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: New England, USA

    Tom.151 Senior Member

    2far2drive,

    I remember that boat very well (was the picture you showed from when you had the boat? I recognized the shed and the carport ;) ) as I was very interested in buying her when she was up for sale a while back (still have all the pics sent to me).

    What ever happened to the boat. I also remember some clever things that were done in building/rebuilding the boat. Did you do the dagger-rudder assembly?

    Cheers,
     
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