Stick welding aluminum

Discussion in 'Materials' started by gonzo, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Does anyone have experience with aluminum welding rods? It seems like a fast way to weld, and it can be done outdoors in the wind.
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Without the shielding gas... you'll get poor quality welds!
     
  3. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    Have used, but just for emergency repairs, with low loads on weld, and where no TIG or MIG equipment available. Tricky, different stick positions, very sensible to moisture; work material to be preheated to reduce hydrogen bubbles. Stick material seldom compatible with base material composition, will cause fractures in HAZ. I've held a licence for alu-welding (TIG and MIG) for long, but I haven't seen a stick weld that would pass a bending test or x-ray.

    But if nothing else is available, then what...... (add a good quality epoxy like Araldit maybe..).

    Edit: ....and besides, the method is veeery slow compared even to TIG-welding!
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2021
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The American Welding Society only addresses the end result for structural aluminum welding. Do the class societies restrict welding techniques?
     
  5. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    DNV explicitly prescribed TIG/MIG for alu welding in earlier rules (for example in the sc "15 m rule"). Since these methods are industry "gold standard", I never bothered checking later versions. But I would expect DNV to accept f.i. plasma and stir/friction welds if they pass mechanical and X-ray testing. Have no "modern" experience from LR or ABS though; guess Ad Hoc and perhaps Barry have better information for you.
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Have you seen this test of various types of Aluminium welding and brazing ? It may be interesting,
     
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  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    As far as I am aware, it is not an approved process for structural welds in Class rules.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I am pretty sure the late member PAR alluded to such methods as a cosmetic rather than structural repairs. I guess if there is damage in an above water element that isn't structurally greatly impaired by it, it has a place.
     

  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I was pretty sure the Class rules won't allow it. AWS allows any method as long as the weld complies with the minimum requirements..
     
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