Steel Welding query

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by JimCooper, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Jeez shugar, this thread died 4 years ago...............
     
  2. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Say what you think is incorrect, then we can learn from you perhaps.

    cheers
     
  3. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Quite right Mikejohns , ok clean your weld area back to bare steel , underneath as well. Grind into either ends of the original weld to make sure all cracks are removed . If your going to stick weld then unless youve got a perfect set up, ie as you would if doing a coding weld test then your going to have it hanging down like a bunch of grapes . This would lead to more grinding , welding underneath.
    I would use mig process unless it was heavy plate such as 10mm and above then i would prefer fluxcore . Ceramic tiles are the dogs bollocks for this and most other butt work . Attach whatever length you need under your work then simply weld over your tiles , cap off with stick if you prefer . If youve took time with your prep etc when you remove the tiles below you should have a tidy finished job .
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Shouldn't you have also added that one can only be sure of the extent of the cracks, for removal, by dye-pen testing rather than by eye, as you appear to suggest?...hence, also, need to be careful if the grinding causes excessive gap between the joints. All you'll do is invite the trigger happy "gap fillers", thinking its ok to weld plate with gaps greater than 1/2t..

    Agreed, ceramic is the DBs for this type of work.
     
  5. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Personally i wouldnt dye pen if it was new construction , however if it was a repair maybe due to a fracture then by all means feel free to dye pen prior to welding.
     
  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    LB'y

    Yes, if a new build, and just a 'mistake' (ie over zealous welding/heat) there should be no need for dye-pen. However, any repair that exhibits a 'crack-like' flaw, new or old, must be dye-pen'd to establish the extend of the crack. That's just basic QA, or at least should be!
     
  7. lumpy bumpy
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    lumpy bumpy Junior Member

    Bearing in mind the original starter of this thread was going to use either cement or wood i think basic QA might not apply in this case . Unless you know of a recognised procedure for this process.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Like you, just responding to comments made.
    Can't imagine one exists!...but since many are not aware of what QA is, thought it best just to point out...just in case anyone is interested in how quality fabrication is done!
     

  9. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    I looked up Dogs-Bollocks and it's a peculiarly English term and there's even an alternative civil version "The Mutts Nuts"

    In strine, anything with bollocks in the sentance means it's NFG particulalrly in welders parlance :)
     
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