Steel boat designs

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by LJF, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. LJF
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: NSW Australia

    LJF New Member

    I have been looking online at various yachts that are made of steel and one thing that I have noticed is that in the underwater design that all of the bilges are really deep and that all of the keels are very long and short. Does anyone know why this is?
    Are there any yachts available with more slender underwater profiles??
     
  2. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

    I would imagine that there are designs similar to the Range Boat (long, relatively narrow beam) with steel hulls somewhere to be had. I would guess that they wouldn't be quite as svelte because of the heavier material compared to FRP or wood.

    I don't know how you feel about them, but have you considered a stabilized monohull as a way to improve static stability of a narrow hull. For an example, though not in steel but just something I knew about off the top of my head, is Kasten's "Pennywise" concept: http://www.kastenmarine.com/PowerTrimaran.htm ... which probably isn't far off what could be done in steel.

    Aside: from what I've read unnecessary weight far port/starboard has a detrimental effect on motion ... so if you do consider a stabilized monohull you might opt for wood or FRP outriggers with a steel main hull.
     
  3. LJF
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    LJF New Member

    Thank you for your reply, those range boats certainly are beutiful, I just need to find if there is anything like that that runs on sailpower. I have considered Trimarans as an option but very few of them are made of steel and multis are VERY expensive compared to monos. But will search these range boats and see if they produced any sail models.
     

  4. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Ah, this clarifies things a bit.

    While a trimaran with all three hulls in steel would probably be a boondoggle, given statements I've read about how "stabilized monohulls" are friendly to steel construction it may be possible to build the central hull of steel and the amas of lighter material, such as plywood with what is called "Cylinder Mold Hull Construction" that is said by some to deliver fair narrow hulls with remarkably little work.

    http://www.multihulldesigns.com/pdf/cm/CYLINDER MOLD MULTIHULL CONSTRUCTION.htm

    This may well result in a boat with somewhat lower sail performance because of the greater displacement of the one steel hull, or such would be my guess, but which may still sail well enough to be a worthwhile cruiser with decent motion comfort (again, based on what I've read ... I'm no NA, just an ME).

    As a bonus, at least to my way of thinking, since cylinder mold promises ease of construction this might mean that if damaged the amas could be easily replaced ... maybe not "disposable" but if damaged you wouldn't need to get all weepy/panicky about the prospects of an expensive, time consuming repair when an outright quick replacement may be doable. For that you may want to look at how Wharram connected his hulls to the bridge deck.
     
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