steam bending of strakers and chines

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by janbo2, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Then you put it in the sea.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, then it goes in the big puddle, but as a result of the heat or boiling, mold spores, bacteria and other beasties or trouble makers are dead.
     
  3. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Mold spores are in the air.
     
  4. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Jarrah steamed & laminated

    Here's a pic of some steamed & laminated jarrah, it's made from 4 laminations of jarrah decking material(remachined but readily available), There's a fair degree of curve just outa the pic, it's in the counter stern of a pearling lugger. I'm not working on it was just there to do some noise readings in the work area & shot this on my ipod as I was getting real environmental noise readings for WHS purposes. Jeff.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Zootalaws
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Zootalaws Junior Member

    That was going to be my recommendation - water pipe. And if you don't muck it up, you can reuse it ;)

    I use a simple wok burner with a 5L steel bucket and a home-made roofing-iron cover. You can get a lot of steam out of 5L...

    My steam source is at the end, with the pipe slanting up at around a 20deg angle. Doesn't take long for steam to be coming out the end...
     
  6. janbo2
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Carnarvon, Western Australia

    janbo2 Junior Member

    I now have some photos to upload. Could someone please tell me the way it is done??
     
  7. janbo2
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Carnarvon, Western Australia

    janbo2 Junior Member

    We also bough a moisture meter and found that some part of the boat had over 35% moisture in the wood. Does anyone have any idea how long this would take to dry to the right moisture content for epoxy to work? The ambient temperature in Carnarvon is approx 25 degrees daytime with a windspeed of around 15 knots, if this helps. The karri frames are around 70x 35.
     
  8. Zootalaws
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Location: SE Asia

    Zootalaws Junior Member

    The last time I was in Carnarvon it felt like moisture was being deliberately ripped from my body by the superheated evil thing you innocently call wind, so I would say in no time at all :)

    But then I fixed it with beer... the rest is a blur...
     
  9. janbo2
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Carnarvon, Western Australia

    janbo2 Junior Member

    Yeah, a great place, when you get used to it....:) And thanks for a somewhat un -scientific answer!!
     
  10. Zootalaws
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Zootalaws Junior Member

    No worries... here to help ;)

    As to uploading pics, go 'advanced' and there is an option lower left to handle attachments.
     
  11. janbo2
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Carnarvon, Western Australia

    janbo2 Junior Member

    Thanks for that, didn't find it, but found the Gallery instead, so there are a few pics there of Sarah Ellen and her old age troubles, which we are having fun curing her from. Our main worry now is the high moisture content in frame and ply, so we have a bit of thumb twiddling in front of us, before the interesting work starts, ie ply fixing and epoxying.
     
  12. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    If the wood is still a bit green might be an idea to try bending it now and let it dry out like that while the other work is taking place. Isn't Karri a bit of a $od to work?
     

  13. janbo2
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Carnarvon, Western Australia

    janbo2 Junior Member

    It is not too bad for normal carpentry work, actually, as it tools up quite well. As far as steam bending, though... Only time will tell, in 4 weeks time in other words!
     
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