State of art for planing hulls

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Dam, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. Dam
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    Dam New Member

    Hi everybody,
    I'm student trying to get his engineering degree.
    My dissertation will be about the optimization of a two-mode hull for a sailing vessel: i.e., a hull effective in displacement as in planing.
    For doing this I have to study and then implement different performance prediction methods, so I need a lot of articles.

    These articles should represent the state of art in the methods of predicting the performances of planing hulls, so I think it would be of great interest for a lot of us if someone could post them.

    MacPherson, D.M. (1993):
    "Reliable Performance Prediction: Techniques Using A Personal Computer", Marine Technology, Vol 30, No. 4, pp. 243-257, October

    Almeter, John .M (1993):
    "Resistance Prediction of Planing Hulls; State of the Art",
    Marine Technology, Vol 30 , No.4 , pp 297 - 307, October

    Keuning, J.A., Gerritsma, J. & Van Terwisga, P.F (1993):
    "Resistance Tests of a Series Planing Hull Forms With 30 Degree Deadrise Angle, and a Calculation Model Based on this and Similar Systematic Series", International Shipbuilding Progress.,Vol 40, No.424 , pp.333-385

    Radojcic, D.(1990):
    "An Engineering Approach to Predicting the Hydrodynamic Performane of Planing Craft using Computer Techniques",
    RINA Transaction, pp 251-267.

    Lahtiharju, E., Karpinen, T., Hellevaara, M and Aitta, T.,(1991):
    "Resistance and Seakeeping Characteristics of Fast Transom Stern Hulls with Systematically Varied Form",
    SNAME Transaction, Vol 99, pp 85-111

    Thanks to anyone helping!!
     
  2. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    The references you listed are certainly good engineering papers, but they don't contain much theory or mathematics. As far as I can remember (and I have photocopies of most of them), not one actually mentions the "3D planing equation".

    If you want to include some theory in your thesis search for classical works on "flat ship theory" by Maruo, Tuck, Faltinsen and Armin Troesch. There are quite a few Russian papers too (usually with "gliding plate" in the title), but they might be difficult to track down in the short time you have for your project.

    Bill Vorus of Uni. New Orleans (still?) had a crack at the problem recently too.
    I saw an early draft of Vorus's work when he was arguing some subtle issues with E.O. Tuck. Unfortunately, Tuck died a few months ago so I guess Vorus won by default. :)

    I'm not sure that you will be actually optimising anything without some form of physics-based theory, but it should be a useful search of the parameter space suggested by the papers.

    Good luck with your research!
    Leo.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2009
  3. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    posting articles may violate someone's copyrights. You should probably approach the publishers for copies.
     
  4. Dam
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    Dam New Member

    @ ancient: I obviously tried to do so, but at SNAME these papers seam to be vanished.

    @ leo: I already studied the classical Savitsky's papers (the '64 and '76 ones), in which there are all the equations for a prismatic hull with a given deadrise. I thought that the papers I mentioned were similar, just more up-to-date, otherwise how can they be implemented in every VPP commercial software? If they give results, these has to be some equations, right?
     
  5. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    All the equations for a prismatc hull? Or do you mean some cobbled-together empirical relations? For example, the 1957 ITTC line is an equation too, but it doesn't mean that is physics-based.

    Attached is a 2005 draft report by Bill Vorus for a semi-displacement/planing method. I'm not sure if the paper at the end ever made it to JSR. There are quite a few typos in the draft, so please get an updated version if you need to use it.

    If I get time I will put together a biblio of other papers I have lying around here.

    Good luck!
    Leo.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
  6. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    From what I gather SNAME is in the process of transferring their articles to digital form. If they are starting at the beginning it might take a long time! Hopefully one of the forum members will be able to help you as you requested in your first post: Good Luck!
     
  7. Dam
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    Dam New Member

    @ Leo: the documents you submitted are very interesting. I understand your point of view: you make the distinction between that methods based upon regression equations (like Savitsky's and the others I asked papers about) and analitical ones.
    The first ones are based upon experimental data, giving equations that reproduce test results without dealing with the general hydrodynamics theory. The second ones start from basic physics principles and aim to describe the fluid motion in an mathematical way that gives the right results.

    There is no question about the fact that the second approach is far more interesting and promising; but I was warned about following it, because this kind of studies are still in an early stage and still don't give consistent results.

    Maybe this warning is now dated: as I can see from your papers, there had been big steps towards the applicability of analitical approach. Now I have to say that I didn't study your papers in a deep way: because the thing is very time consuming, I'm just asking you (that surely know them well) if it's worth it. I mean: with the papers you submitted there is the possibility of calculating the hull resistance (in dipl, forced and planing mode) in a complete and reliable way?
    There are any other papers needed to reach this target?
    As you can see, I'm thinking whether to change approach and use yours (analitical methods I mean).

    Anyway, I say to everyone in the forum, my request for the papers I listed is still valid (for safety at least).
    Thank you all!!
     
  8. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    The warning you were given was very serious. Heed it, or be
    prepared for not only some tough maths, but also great
    difficulties with actually computing them.
    Although some 3D-planing equations have been known for a
    long time, they really are a pig to calculate.

    Some people have tried Vortex Lattice-like Methods with
    reasonable success, but they are inevitably for planforms
    that have straight edges. The main problem is that VLMs
    don't do well on planforms with curved leading-edges or
    trailing edges. That might not always be a big disadvantage
    for the hulls you are interested in.

    I hope the attached papers will help you to decide which way you want
    to go with the project, but you have now been warned twice :)
    If not, then you can at least mention in your thesis that you have considered alternatives.

    All the best,
    Leo.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
  9. Dam
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    Dam New Member

    Hi Leo,
    I took some time before replying to study the problem and talk with my professor. The thing is that...I discovered who you are! That is, talking with some expert professors I know, I learned that you're not just an informed user of the forum, but that you are one of the top researchers in field, and that your work is known all around the world (here in Italy too). So I thank you very much for your answers and your time.

    I also decided about the problem of which direction to give to my work. As I previously said, I was given a warning about the fact that analitycal methods were at a stage of research. But, thinking about it, this is not a bad thing; at the contrary: it could give my work something more.

    These studies are more modern than the empiric performance prediction methods enlisted in my first post; and (as I already knew) far more promising, as confirmed by the documents you sent me (and others I found on your site!). So I decided to give this shape to my work: I would like to study and to present in my thesis theese researches, in order to make them available to the people who will follow me in developing the project of the sailing vessel I talked about in my first post.

    So, I have some question for you (and, of course, for everybody who can help).
    I found very interesting (for the moment) the first document you sent me, that is, the Vorus 2005 paper "Tools for semi planing-semi displacement ship design with applications".
    As I could understand, it puts together the two main methods for the resolution of the Laplace problem with linearized boundary conditions: the (1) thin ship solution (firstly by Michell) and the (2) flat ship solution (firstly by Maruo); it just superposes them, in order to have a solution (that we can call T-ship theory) that accounts either for displacement and for planing.
    The question is: can you post some paper in which the two theories are developed? In fact I have some difficulties to develop the mathematical steps to come to the results presented (in particular the flat ship), but I want to master them in order to make a good work.
    I also took a look to the vortex lattice methods, but for the now I would like to focus on the T-ship (I save them for later on).

    Thank you for yor attention, Leo...know that your work is very appreciated.
    Good bye
     

  10. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    That's very kind, but I was very lucky to have E.O. Tuck as a mathematical colleague for many years. He was the famous one: I just turned his mathematical hieroglyphics into useful code.

    The essential reference for wave resistance is:
    "The Wave Resistance of Ships"
    John V. Wehausen
    Advances in applied mechanics, Volume 13.

    You should also get a copy of:
    J.V. Wehausen and E.V. Laitone
    "Surface Waves"

    The hydrodynamics community have kindly made it available on-line at:
    http://coe.berkeley.edu/SurfaceWaves/

    Flat Ship Theory is described in:
    E.O. Tuck
    "Low-aspect-ratio flat ship theory",
    J. Hydronautics, Vol. 9, No. 1, Jan. 1975, pp. 3-12.

    The "T-ship" theory you are thinking of was actually proposed many years ago, but I can't remember who first tried it. It might have been George Gadd or N. Hogben. When I find the paper in my heap of junk I'll post the reference here.

    Another good reference is:
    Cheng, X. and Wellicome, J.F.,
    Study of Planing Hydrodynamics using strips of Transversely Variable Pressure",
    J. Ship Research, Vol. 38, No. 1, March 1994, pp. 30-41.

    All the best,
    Leo.
     
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